Discussion:
What do I do with this? (wasp nest)
(too old to reply)
Tim Downie
2008-02-15 15:57:17 UTC
Permalink
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I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have it
in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?

Tim
Mary Fisher
2008-02-15 16:23:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have
it in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Tim
Perfectly safe but it wouldn't be re-occupied anyway.

Put a bin liner round it and use a carving knife to cut it, carefully, from
the timber. Support it underneath and lower it into the bag.

It's a beautiful nest, if you have children let them see it and cut it,
again with a carving knife (it will be surprisingly tough inside)
vertically, to show the construction. Or just look and marvel yourself!

Mary
Dave Liquorice
2008-02-15 21:04:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Fisher
It's a beautiful nest, if you have children let them see it and cut it,
again with a carving knife (it will be surprisingly tough inside)
vertically, to show the construction. Or just look and marvel yourself!
If the OP has no kids or gran kids, see if the local primary school would
like it for their nature table. Better still and a good excercise for the
OP to research and offer to do a short talk to the school on wasps and
their life cycle.

Wasps are a much maligned creature, yes they sting and it hurts like *FCK*
(experience) but a sting is rarely more than just pain and swelling for a
day or three. Generally Wasps don't sting unless seriously threatened so
it becomes an act of self defence. Just like humans they get a bit
unpredictable when drunk. You wouldn't go up to a group of drunken youths
waving your arms about screaming and shouting trying to move 'em on so why
do the same with a wasp after it has been feeding on wind fall fruit?
--
Cheers
Dave.
Mary Fisher
2008-02-15 21:18:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Liquorice
Post by Mary Fisher
It's a beautiful nest, if you have children let them see it and cut it,
again with a carving knife (it will be surprisingly tough inside)
vertically, to show the construction. Or just look and marvel yourself!
If the OP has no kids or gran kids, see if the local primary school would
like it for their nature table. Better still and a good excercise for the
OP to research and offer to do a short talk to the school on wasps and
their life cycle.
Wasps are a much maligned creature, yes they sting and it hurts like *FCK*
(experience) but a sting is rarely more than just pain and swelling for a
day or three. Generally Wasps don't sting unless seriously threatened so
it becomes an act of self defence. Just like humans they get a bit
unpredictable when drunk. You wouldn't go up to a group of drunken youths
waving your arms about screaming and shouting trying to move 'em on so why
do the same with a wasp after it has been feeding on wind fall fruit?
More or less right.

Thanks, Dave,

Mary>
Post by Dave Liquorice
--
Cheers
Dave.
Peter Twydell
2008-02-16 09:48:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Liquorice
Post by Mary Fisher
It's a beautiful nest, if you have children let them see it and cut it,
again with a carving knife (it will be surprisingly tough inside)
vertically, to show the construction. Or just look and marvel yourself!
If the OP has no kids or gran kids, see if the local primary school would
like it for their nature table. Better still and a good excercise for the
OP to research and offer to do a short talk to the school on wasps and
their life cycle.
Wasps are a much maligned creature, yes they sting and it hurts like *FCK*
(experience) but a sting is rarely more than just pain and swelling for a
day or three. Generally Wasps don't sting unless seriously threatened so
it becomes an act of self defence.
One stung me on the calf while I was trying to destroy its nest in the
roof space of our extension a couple of years ago. No big deal.

Next attempt at destruction was in our present house, a converted barn.
The little devils had built their nest inside the wall, and you could
hear them literally eating the house. So, out with the spray. One zoomed
at me and got me on the eyebrow. Different result this time. Hurt like
hell, eye swelled up (hideously ugly photos available), ten days of eye
drops and antibiotics. Laid anti-wasp dust near the nest and haven't
seen a live one since.
Post by Dave Liquorice
Just like humans they get a bit
unpredictable when drunk. You wouldn't go up to a group of drunken youths
waving your arms about screaming and shouting trying to move 'em on so why
do the same with a wasp after it has been feeding on wind fall fruit?
--
Peter

Ying tong iddle-i po!
Dave Liquorice
2008-02-16 21:40:06 UTC
Permalink
One stung me on the calf while I was trying to destroy its nest ...
Self defence, well defence of the nest.
Next attempt at destruction was in our present house, a converted barn.
The little devils had built their nest inside the wall, and you could
hear them literally eating the house.
No, you could hear them scratching about they don't build from or damage
sound timber. They make the "paper" for their nests from wood that has
started to break down. The grey fibrous stuff after exposure to sunlight
is a favorite.
One zoomed at me and got me on the eyebrow.
Defence again. If some fecking great monster came along trying to destroy
your home you'd use what you had available to try and stop it.
--
Cheers
Dave.
geoff
2008-02-16 22:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Liquorice
One stung me on the calf while I was trying to destroy its nest ...
Self defence, well defence of the nest.
Next attempt at destruction was in our present house, a converted barn.
The little devils had built their nest inside the wall, and you could
hear them literally eating the house.
No, you could hear them scratching about they don't build from or damage
sound timber. They make the "paper" for their nests from wood that has
started to break down. The grey fibrous stuff after exposure to sunlight
is a favorite.
One zoomed at me and got me on the eyebrow.
Defence again. If some fecking great monster came along trying to destroy
your home you'd use what you had available to try and stop it.
So, when you're sitting at a garden table, no food, no drink, no sudden
movements and one tings you, is that pre-emptive self defence, or what ?
--
geoff
Dave Liquorice
2008-02-17 12:05:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by geoff
So, when you're sitting at a garden table, no food, no drink, no sudden
movements and one tings you, is that pre-emptive self defence, or what ?
That is your direct personal experience, in which case give the full
story, or just hear say?
--
Cheers
Dave.
geoff
2008-02-17 13:04:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Liquorice
Post by geoff
So, when you're sitting at a garden table, no food, no drink, no sudden
movements and one tings you, is that pre-emptive self defence, or what ?
That is your direct personal experience, in which case give the full
story, or just hear say?
What more of a full story are you after ?

Sitting talking to my brother across a bench table in the back garden,
suddenly felt the bugger sting me

bastard thing ...
--
geoff
Dave Liquorice
2008-02-17 14:12:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by geoff
What more of a full story are you after ?
Sitting talking to my brother across a bench table in the back garden,
suddenly felt the bugger sting me
More information on where it stung you? As you are obviously avoiding that
I suspect it became inadvertantly trapped between you and something else
and was about to be crushed.

That's what happened when I got stung by a wasp, it got up a loose T shirt
sleeve when my arm was raised. When I lowered my arm it was trapped in the
edge of my arm pit, it stung in self defence to avoid being squidged. It
worked I lfted my arm and it flew away...
--
Cheers
Dave.
Mary Fisher
2008-02-17 14:27:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Liquorice
Post by geoff
What more of a full story are you after ?
Sitting talking to my brother across a bench table in the back garden,
suddenly felt the bugger sting me
More information on where it stung you? As you are obviously avoiding that
I suspect it became inadvertantly trapped between you and something else
and was about to be crushed.
That's what happened when I got stung by a wasp, it got up a loose T shirt
sleeve when my arm was raised. When I lowered my arm it was trapped in the
edge of my arm pit, it stung in self defence to avoid being squidged. It
worked I lfted my arm and it flew away...
That's the usual reason for being stung 'for no reason'. Another is emitting
whjat the wasp senses as a threatening pheromone - chemical messenger. That
might be a dye in clothing or something which seems pleasing to us such as
scent, after-shave etc - or just our own body smell even if we're not aware
of it.

Wasps communicate partly through scent, they have a far greater sense than
humans.

Mary
Post by Dave Liquorice
--
Cheers
Dave.
geoff
2008-02-17 14:33:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Liquorice
Post by geoff
What more of a full story are you after ?
Sitting talking to my brother across a bench table in the back garden,
suddenly felt the bugger sting me
More information on where it stung you? As you are obviously avoiding that
I suspect it became inadvertantly trapped between you and something else
and was about to be crushed.
I'm not avoiding anything

Sitting at a table talking, not waving my arms in a threatening way,
bare arm

Stop trying to see what's not there to see

Sitting talking quietly on a summer's day - little fucker alighted on my
arm and stung me

full story, end of
Post by Dave Liquorice
That's what happened when I got stung by a wasp, it got up a loose T shirt
sleeve when my arm was raised. When I lowered my arm it was trapped in the
edge of my arm pit, it stung in self defence to avoid being squidged. It
worked I lfted my arm and it flew away...
--
geoff
Peter Twydell
2008-02-17 17:07:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Liquorice
One stung me on the calf while I was trying to destroy its nest ...
Self defence, well defence of the nest.
I did realise that, so couldn't blame it for having a go.
Post by Dave Liquorice
Next attempt at destruction was in our present house, a converted barn.
The little devils had built their nest inside the wall, and you could
hear them literally eating the house.
No, you could hear them scratching about they don't build from or damage
sound timber. They make the "paper" for their nests from wood that has
started to break down. The grey fibrous stuff after exposure to sunlight
is a favorite.
I have seen and heard one having a go at a fence post, so I thought they
might be doing the same here. The nest was (is?) in the wall of what I
think is a newish extension to the original structure, so the wood there
is not old.
Post by Dave Liquorice
One zoomed at me and got me on the eyebrow.
Defence again. If some fecking great monster came along trying to destroy
your home you'd use what you had available to try and stop it.
True. It was on a July evening last year, when I thought they would have
been quiet. All the others were, as this was the only one I saw.
--
Peter

Ying tong iddle-i po!
TheScullster
2008-02-15 17:05:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have
it in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Tim
What's the crud underneath it?
Tim Downie
2008-02-15 17:03:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheScullster
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not
have it in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Tim
What's the crud underneath it?
Just an old bit of felt (no, I don't know why).

Tim
keith_765
2008-02-15 20:45:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Downie
Post by TheScullster
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not
have it in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Tim
What's the crud underneath it?
Just an old bit of felt (no, I don't know why).
Tim
While your up there increase your loft insulation
dennis@home
2008-02-15 20:00:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have
it in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Tim
Wasp's nest soup.
geoff
2008-02-15 20:58:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have it
in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Give it to Andy Hall -
--
geoff
Andy Hall
2008-02-15 21:09:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by geoff
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have it
in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Give it to Andy Hall -
What am I meant to do with it?

I suppose it could be another application for the Mapp gas torch, but
one would want to have living wasps inside to make that fully
worthwhile.
Bob Eager
2008-02-15 21:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Hall
Post by geoff
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have it
in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Give it to Andy Hall -
What am I meant to do with it?
I suppose it could be another application for the Mapp gas torch, but
one would want to have living wasps inside to make that fully
worthwhile.
I'm surprised that Mary hasn't been along yet to say that the OP should
be hugging it instead of wiping it out.
--
The information contained in this post is copyright the
poster, and specifically may not be published in, or used by
http://www.diybanter.com
Mary Fisher
2008-02-15 21:19:00 UTC
Permalink
"Bob Eager" <***@spamcop.net> wrote in message news:176uZD2KcidF-pn2-***@rikki.tavi.co.uk...

...
Post by Bob Eager
I'm surprised that Mary hasn't been along yet to say that the OP should
be hugging it instead of wiping it out.
Too late with your barrow!

Mary
geoff
2008-02-16 19:55:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Hall
Post by geoff
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have it
in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Give it to Andy Hall -
What am I meant to do with it?
OOps - not paying attention properly there, sorry
Post by Andy Hall
I suppose it could be another application for the Mapp gas torch, but
one would want to have living wasps inside to make that fully
worthwhile.
Surely better to fill the nest with gas and light blue touch paper
--
geoff
Andy Hall
2008-02-16 19:57:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by geoff
Post by Andy Hall
Post by geoff
Post by Tim Downie
http://www.zen31010.zen.co.uk/images/waspnest.jpg
I appreciate that there's probably nothing in it but I'd rather not have it
in my loft. Is is safe to remove it at this time of year?
Give it to Andy Hall -
What am I meant to do with it?
OOps - not paying attention properly there, sorry
Post by Andy Hall
I suppose it could be another application for the Mapp gas torch, but
one would want to have living wasps inside to make that fully
worthwhile.
Surely better to fill the nest with gas and light blue touch paper
Now that would be exciting. Exploding jaspers everywhere. No less
than they deserve.
Grimly Curmudgeon
2008-02-16 21:15:27 UTC
Permalink
We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
Post by Andy Hall
Post by geoff
Surely better to fill the nest with gas and light blue touch paper
Now that would be exciting. Exploding jaspers everywhere. No less
than they deserve.
<MF>
You're a heartless callous beast.
</MF>
--
Dave
George (dicegeorge)
2008-02-17 00:38:52 UTC
Permalink
i dont think wasps are active in this cold.

old wasp nests can be moved into by mice and other vermin,
thats why they should be removed.
Post by geoff
Surely better to fill the nest with gas and light blue touch paper
and burn your house down!

[g]
Mary Fisher
2008-02-17 09:43:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by George (dicegeorge)
i dont think wasps are active in this cold.
Only new queens are left from the old colony and they aren't in the nest.
Post by George (dicegeorge)
old wasp nests can be moved into by mice and other vermin,
thats why they should be removed.
What you call vermin are creatures which serve a useful purpose (in our
human terms) by getting rid of what's not neded any longer.

If there's no old nest there mice will find somewhere else to go, you can't
blame the presence of mice on an old nest.

Mary
The Real Doctor
2008-02-17 09:35:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Hall
I suppose it could be another application for the Mapp gas torch, but
one would want to have living wasps inside to make that fully
worthwhile.
I had great fun with a nest in the garden ... first dowsed it in
meths, then waited for it to soak in, then set light to it. The best
bit were the ones who emerged on fire and plunged in flames like very
small Messerschmitts.

Ian
Mary Fisher
2008-02-17 09:43:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Doctor
Post by Andy Hall
I suppose it could be another application for the Mapp gas torch, but
one would want to have living wasps inside to make that fully
worthwhile.
I had great fun with a nest in the garden ... first dowsed it in
meths, then waited for it to soak in, then set light to it. The best
bit were the ones who emerged on fire and plunged in flames like very
small Messerschmitts.
Ian
In the same way as terrorists enjoy watching their victims?
Stuart Noble
2008-02-17 10:50:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Fisher
Post by The Real Doctor
Post by Andy Hall
I suppose it could be another application for the Mapp gas torch, but
one would want to have living wasps inside to make that fully
worthwhile.
I had great fun with a nest in the garden ... first dowsed it in
meths, then waited for it to soak in, then set light to it. The best
bit were the ones who emerged on fire and plunged in flames like very
small Messerschmitts.
Ian
In the same way as terrorists enjoy watching their victims?
I have no problems with wasps in the loft until the last knockings when
they either seem to lose their way, or they're attracted into the house
by warmth. I suppose I'd rather die in the warm as well
The Real Doctor
2008-02-17 14:46:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Fisher
Post by The Real Doctor
I had great fun with a nest in the garden ... first dowsed it in
meths, then waited for it to soak in, then set light to it. The best
bit were the ones who emerged on fire and plunged in flames like very
small Messerschmitts.
In the same way as terrorists enjoy watching their victims?
I have no idea whether terrorists enjoy watching their victims. But
since the little fuckers had been having a go at me, I felt about as
little dismay at watching them burn as I felt at the TV footage of
smouldering doctors outside Glasgow airport.

Ian
Mary Fisher
2008-02-17 14:50:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Doctor
Post by Mary Fisher
Post by The Real Doctor
I had great fun with a nest in the garden ... first dowsed it in
meths, then waited for it to soak in, then set light to it. The best
bit were the ones who emerged on fire and plunged in flames like very
small Messerschmitts.
In the same way as terrorists enjoy watching their victims?
I have no idea whether terrorists enjoy watching their victims. But
since the little fuckers had been having a go at me, I felt about as
little dismay at watching them burn as I felt at the TV footage of
smouldering doctors outside Glasgow airport.
Ian
As it happens you're wrong in that as in other things. The wasps you see
round or from a nest aren't fuckers, they don't have the equipment.
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