Discussion:
OT: Android Tablets
(too old to reply)
Bill
2011-09-10 19:37:30 UTC
Permalink
How's this for stupidity? I "helped" a friend get his iPad2 connected to
his router and said "But what can you do with the Pad that the laptop
can't?",

Then I thought ..... better keep up to date and have a look at Android
(all I can afford) with perhaps a view to writing a little program to
remote control things over the network. So I have an Android emulator
running on a PC and have "run" the first couple of examples of how to
write apps.

My mobile phone is primitive, non Android and non-clever, so I'm
starting from a happy state of total ignorance. I went onto ebay and
invested in a cheap used Chinese 7" tablet. It seems to be one where all
the guts are made by Via and it works much better than I expected.

I realise these things are basically toys, but it looks to have some
potential if I can get past the poor instruction book. Is anyone using
one of these "as it comes" for anything useful and does anyone have any
recommendation for a website or even a book that is worth a visit?
--
Bill
Alan
2011-09-10 21:50:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
I realise these things are basically toys,
But with a smartphone running Android you not only get the phone but a
camera, or two, Wi-fi, Bluetooth, GPS, Motion sensors.

It's the combination of functionality in a mobile device that makes it a
nicer toy.
--
Alan
news2009 {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
Brian Gaff
2011-09-11 07:05:31 UTC
Permalink
Yeah, all we need now is a real keyboaoard so real people can type on the
things.

Brian
--
Brian Gaff - ***@blueyonder.co.uk
Note:- In order to reduce spam, any email without 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name may be lost.
Blind user, so no pictures please!
Post by Alan
Post by Bill
I realise these things are basically toys,
But with a smartphone running Android you not only get the phone but a
camera, or two, Wi-fi, Bluetooth, GPS, Motion sensors.
It's the combination of functionality in a mobile device that makes it a
nicer toy.
--
Alan
news2009 {at} admac {dot} myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
Nitro®
2011-09-11 08:48:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Gaff
Yeah, all we need now is a real keyboaoard so real people can type on the
things.
Brian
Have you actually tried one Brian? They have speech recognition and text
to speech
these days. Still not great for the Blind or partially sighted but not
entirely
inaccessable.
--
"I'm not the messiah!"
I say you are Lord.
And I should know, I've followed a few !
Andy Burns
2011-09-11 09:13:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nitro®
all we need now is a real keyboard so real people can type on the
things.
Have you actually tried one Brian? They have speech recognition and
text to speech these days. Still not great for the Blind or partially
sighted but not entirely inaccessable.
I'd have thought they were as good as inacessible

You need to see the virtual button to pop-up the on-screen keyboard, and
to see whether the "press" was successful, then see where the speech
recognition "button" is on the keyboard, and whether you pressed that
button successfully, and of course to read the sometimes hilarious
result of the recognition.
Rob
2011-09-11 10:23:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Nitro®
all we need now is a real keyboard so real people can type on the
things.
Have you actually tried one Brian? They have speech recognition and
text to speech these days. Still not great for the Blind or partially
sighted but not entirely inaccessable.
I'd have thought they were as good as inacessible
You need to see the virtual button to pop-up the on-screen keyboard, and
to see whether the "press" was successful, then see where the speech
recognition "button" is on the keyboard, and whether you pressed that
button successfully, and of course to read the sometimes hilarious
result of the recognition.
I think Voiceover addresses your criticism to a point:

http://www.nillabyte.com/entry.php?280-Accessibility-For-iPhone-And-iPod-touch-A-Blind-User-s-Review

Rob
unknown
2011-09-11 10:22:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Nitro®
all we need now is a real keyboard so real people can type on the
things.
Have you actually tried one Brian? They have speech recognition and
text to speech these days. Still not great for the Blind or partially
sighted but not entirely inaccessable.
I'd have thought they were as good as inacessible
You need to see the virtual button to pop-up the on-screen keyboard, and
to see whether the "press" was successful, then see where the speech
recognition "button" is on the keyboard, and whether you pressed that
button successfully, and of course to read the sometimes hilarious
result of the recognition.
Or you can just turn on VoiceOver which is well liked by most
blind/visually handicapped users. Oh sorry I forgot we were talking of
imitation iPads that cost more than iPads for lesser functionality.
Bob Martin
2011-09-12 07:26:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Nitro®
all we need now is a real keyboard so real people can type on the
things.
Have you actually tried one Brian? They have speech recognition and
text to speech these days. Still not great for the Blind or partially
sighted but not entirely inaccessable.
I'd have thought they were as good as inacessible
You need to see the virtual button to pop-up the on-screen keyboard, and
to see whether the "press" was successful, then see where the speech
recognition "button" is on the keyboard, and whether you pressed that
button successfully, and of course to read the sometimes hilarious
result of the recognition.
One of my Android phones has a slide-out physical keyboard.
I also have a bluetooth keyboard (about 2"x4") which works with most Android phones.
Nightjar
2011-09-11 09:51:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Alan
Post by Bill
I realise these things are basically toys,
But with a smartphone running Android you not only get the phone but a
camera, or two, Wi-fi, Bluetooth, GPS, Motion sensors.
It's the combination of functionality in a mobile device that makes it a
nicer toy.
Apart from using Bluetooth to link to my car for hands-free use, all I
want from a mobile phone is the ability to make and receive phone calls.

Colin Bignell
polygonum
2011-09-11 12:17:20 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 11 Sep 2011 10:51:19 +0100, Nightjar
Post by Nightjar
Post by Alan
Post by Bill
I realise these things are basically toys,
But with a smartphone running Android you not only get the phone but a
camera, or two, Wi-fi, Bluetooth, GPS, Motion sensors.
It's the combination of functionality in a mobile device that makes it a
nicer toy.
Apart from using Bluetooth to link to my car for hands-free use, all I
want from a mobile phone is the ability to make and receive phone calls.
Colin Bignell
Almost agreed.

Rumours have it that Apple will launch an iPod Touch with 3G capability.
And I might be tempted if they do. All the benefits of a smartphone - but
carry on using a cheap-ish ordinary mobile for phone calls. And one very
important reason is the much better battery life you usually get. (Never
as good as my old Nokia...) And the relative cheapness of a replacement if
you drop it or lose it. So long as the connectivity charges don't end up
being silly.

The one thing I hate about ordinary mobiles is the awkwardness of sending
SMS messages. But sending/receiving is the only other facility I want from
a mobile.
--
Rod
Bill
2011-09-11 13:35:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by polygonum
On Sun, 11 Sep 2011 10:51:19 +0100, Nightjar
Post by Nightjar
Post by Alan
Post by Bill
I realise these things are basically toys,
But with a smartphone running Android you not only get the phone but a
camera, or two, Wi-fi, Bluetooth, GPS, Motion sensors.
It's the combination of functionality in a mobile device that makes it a
nicer toy.
Apart from using Bluetooth to link to my car for hands-free use, all
I want from a mobile phone is the ability to make and receive phone
calls.
Colin Bignell
Almost agreed.
Rumours have it that Apple will launch an iPod Touch with 3G
capability. And I might be tempted if they do. All the benefits of a
smartphone - but carry on using a cheap-ish ordinary mobile for phone
calls. And one very important reason is the much better battery life
you usually get. (Never as good as my old Nokia...) And the relative
cheapness of a replacement if you drop it or lose it. So long as the
connectivity charges don't end up being silly.
The one thing I hate about ordinary mobiles is the awkwardness of
sending SMS messages. But sending/receiving is the only other facility
I want from a mobile.
All very interesting, but........

I have no interest in having to carry around, like the children,
something like a piece of jewellery. I'm happy with my clamshell phone
which can live in my pocket and never rings anyone by mistake when I sit
down.

I was asking about an Android 7 inch screen tablet, which appears to be
one of the ones where VIA make a chip, mount and sell it, assembled, to
a smiling Chinaman who sticks it into a plastic case and sells it to an
Englishman for a penny plus £49.99 postage.

I'm trying to work out whether I can make it remote control a PC
wirelessly on my local network. It's totally silent - no fan, HD or
keyboard noise - so ideal, for example, for controlling an audio
recording PC in another room, or able to be thrown in the car with a
webcam to use as a display for the solo hooking up of trailers.

There is a design fault - the usb sockets in wobbly adapter are too
close to the charger/psu socket - and I'm not yet sure whether Android
is, like the heel that killed Beos, difficult to use in a straight local
network situation.

That's why I was asking about decent sources of information about
Android software and whether others are using this sort of device for
anything useful.
--
Bill
Owain
2011-09-11 14:45:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
I'm trying to work out whether I can make it remote control a PC
wirelessly on my local network.
Yes.

If your PC has a VNC server then there is a VNC viewer.
http://code.google.com/p/android-vnc-viewer/

Otherwise Teamviewer is available for Android and Iphone
http://www.teamviewer.com/en/download/index.aspx
Teamviewer is free for non-commmercial use.

If your PC talks RDP then there is a paid-for RDP client in the
Android App store or on Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004W48QFG?ref=mas_dl

Other terminal emulators are also available.

Owain
Andy Burns
2011-09-11 14:52:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Owain
If your PC talks RDP then there is a paid-for RDP client in the
Android App store or on Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004W48QFG?ref=mas_dl
Wyse do an RDP client which is free to use with a single stored server,
or paid for if you wish to store details of multiple servers ...

http://www.wyse.co.uk/products/software/pocketcloud/index.asp
polygonum
2011-09-11 15:02:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Owain
Post by Bill
I'm trying to work out whether I can make it remote control a PC
wirelessly on my local network.
Yes.
If your PC has a VNC server then there is a VNC viewer.
http://code.google.com/p/android-vnc-viewer/
Otherwise Teamviewer is available for Android and Iphone
http://www.teamviewer.com/en/download/index.aspx
Teamviewer is free for non-commmercial use.
If your PC talks RDP then there is a paid-for RDP client in the
Android App store or on Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004W48QFG?ref=mas_dl
Other terminal emulators are also available.
Owain
Or LogMeIn Ignition for Android, if that route would work for you. Does
cost, though.
--
Rod
The Medway Handyman
2011-09-11 10:08:42 UTC
Permalink
On 10/09/2011 20:37, Bill wrote:

Do you have an android with a headache then?
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
Nightjar
2011-09-11 14:22:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
How's this for stupidity? I "helped" a friend get his iPad2 connected to
his router and said "But what can you do with the Pad that the laptop
can't?",
Then I thought ..... better keep up to date and have a look at Android
(all I can afford) with perhaps a view to writing a little program to
remote control things over the network. So I have an Android emulator
running on a PC and have "run" the first couple of examples of how to
write apps.
My mobile phone is primitive, non Android and non-clever, so I'm
starting from a happy state of total ignorance. I went onto ebay and
invested in a cheap used Chinese 7" tablet. It seems to be one where all
the guts are made by Via and it works much better than I expected.
I realise these things are basically toys, but it looks to have some
potential if I can get past the poor instruction book. Is anyone using
one of these "as it comes" for anything useful and does anyone have any
recommendation for a website or even a book that is worth a visit?
Looking at my website analytics, around 3% of viewings are on mobile
devices and 75% of those use Android.

C P Bignell
www.norscreenfilters.co.uk
Devany
2011-09-11 15:39:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
How's this for stupidity? I "helped" a friend get his iPad2 connected to
his router and said "But what can you do with the Pad that the laptop
can't?",
Then I thought ..... better keep up to date and have a look at Android
(all I can afford) with perhaps a view to writing a little program to
remote control things over the network. So I have an Android emulator
running on a PC and have "run" the first couple of examples of how to
write apps.
My mobile phone is primitive, non Android and non-clever, so I'm
starting from a happy state of total ignorance. I went onto ebay and
invested in a cheap used Chinese 7" tablet. It seems to be one where all
the guts are made by Via and it works much better than I expected.
I realise these things are basically toys, but it looks to have some
potential if I can get past the poor instruction book. Is anyone using
one of these "as it comes" for anything useful and does anyone have any
recommendation for a website or even a book that is worth a visit?
I have an HTC Flyer (an expensive 7" Android Tablet). I don't leave the
house without it now. I can just fit it in a pocket.

It's the size of a paperback book, and I keep a load of books in it.
Wifi & 3G means the internet is always on etc.

It came with a program called Evernote which I now use to take notes,
combine with photos etc.

I just been measuring up some door parts for a bit of work. Photo'd the
door, drew a line on the photo, typed in (it's not so hard) the length
and width of a couple of parts etc.

All that info is now auto synced to a web site, so when I figure out
what to buy, I've got the photos, the measurements etc. all to hand.

It's definitely not a toy.

http://www.xda-developers.com
Mike Barnes
2011-09-11 20:19:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
How's this for stupidity? I "helped" a friend get his iPad2 connected
to his router and said "But what can you do with the Pad that the
laptop can't?",
Then I thought ..... better keep up to date and have a look at Android
(all I can afford) with perhaps a view to writing a little program to
remote control things over the network. So I have an Android emulator
running on a PC and have "run" the first couple of examples of how to
write apps.
My mobile phone is primitive, non Android and non-clever, so I'm
starting from a happy state of total ignorance. I went onto ebay and
invested in a cheap used Chinese 7" tablet. It seems to be one where
all the guts are made by Via and it works much better than I expected.
I realise these things are basically toys, but it looks to have some
potential if I can get past the poor instruction book. Is anyone using
one of these "as it comes" for anything useful and does anyone have any
recommendation for a website or even a book that is worth a visit?
I bought an iPad cheap on eBay to see what the fuss was about. It
quickly became part of the family. It lives in the kitchen and is used
for viewing web pages, as and when required. Before the iPad we used a
netbook but the iPad is a hundred times better.

I also use the iPad as a remote control for my home media server and
audio amplifier. Both of those applications involve a lot of extra
expenditure and I guess they wouldn't be of interest.

But just as a mobile domestic web browser, the iPad was worth the price.
--
Mike Barnes
Bill
2011-09-12 08:33:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Barnes
I bought an iPad cheap on eBay to see what the fuss was about. It
quickly became part of the family. It lives in the kitchen and is used
for viewing web pages, as and when required. Before the iPad we used a
netbook but the iPad is a hundred times better.
I also use the iPad as a remote control for my home media server and
audio amplifier. Both of those applications involve a lot of extra
expenditure and I guess they wouldn't be of interest.
But just as a mobile domestic web browser, the iPad was worth the price.
I can see the value as a mobile web browser, and this Android thing has
already been used by family members who can't cope or don't want a PC in
the lounge.

My son has an iPhone and keeps telling me that the most useful app is
the ruler, so I found a free app in Android market called Smart Ruler
and installed it. Well, either my tape measure has shrunk or it's broke,
and I can't see any setup feature anywhere. Also, sometimes the search
works and sometimes not - eg not in Android Market.
This, and the difficulty in finding any clear guidance as to how apps
are supposed to be set up, is what made me think it's a bit of a toy.

I do appreciate that you get what you pay for and it is about an eighth
the price of an iPad.

I'm busy now watching the videos about writing apps for it and lurking
in the xda-developers forum.

I'll also look into Teamviewer (I use LogMeIn on the PC's, and assume
they can co-exist).

Thanks to all for the advice and suggestions.
--
Bill
Bob Eager
2011-09-12 11:13:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
Post by Mike Barnes
I bought an iPad cheap on eBay to see what the fuss was about. It
quickly became part of the family. It lives in the kitchen and is used
for viewing web pages, as and when required. Before the iPad we used a
netbook but the iPad is a hundred times better.
I also use the iPad as a remote control for my home media server and
audio amplifier. Both of those applications involve a lot of extra
expenditure and I guess they wouldn't be of interest.
But just as a mobile domestic web browser, the iPad was worth the price.
I can see the value as a mobile web browser, and this Android thing has
already been used by family members who can't cope or don't want a PC in
the lounge.
My son has an iPhone and keeps telling me that the most useful app is
the ruler, so I found a free app in Android market called Smart Ruler
and installed it. Well, either my tape measure has shrunk or it's broke,
and I can't see any setup feature anywhere.
Usually you press the menu 'button' and it's there. There's a free Swiss
Army Knife app (no knife included!) that has a ruler. That can be
calibrated.
--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org

*lightning protection* - a w_tom conductor
Devany
2011-09-12 17:51:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
Post by Mike Barnes
I bought an iPad cheap on eBay to see what the fuss was about. It
quickly became part of the family. It lives in the kitchen and is used
for viewing web pages, as and when required. Before the iPad we used a
netbook but the iPad is a hundred times better.
I also use the iPad as a remote control for my home media server and
audio amplifier. Both of those applications involve a lot of extra
expenditure and I guess they wouldn't be of interest.
But just as a mobile domestic web browser, the iPad was worth the price.
I can see the value as a mobile web browser, and this Android thing has
already been used by family members who can't cope or don't want a PC in
the lounge.
My son has an iPhone and keeps telling me that the most useful app is
the ruler, so I found a free app in Android market called Smart Ruler
and installed it. Well, either my tape measure has shrunk or it's broke,
and I can't see any setup feature anywhere. Also, sometimes the search
works and sometimes not - eg not in Android Market.
This, and the difficulty in finding any clear guidance as to how apps
are supposed to be set up, is what made me think it's a bit of a toy.
I do appreciate that you get what you pay for and it is about an eighth
the price of an iPad.
I'm busy now watching the videos about writing apps for it and lurking
in the xda-developers forum.
I'll also look into Teamviewer (I use LogMeIn on the PC's, and assume
they can co-exist).
Thanks to all for the advice and suggestions.
Bear in mind that the cheaper tablets are mostly using older versions of
Android. The latest tablet version is v3.+ aka Honeycomb.

Your cheap tablet is probably running v1.5 or 1.6.

There is a lot of difference.

Somewhere in xda-developers there is probably a ROM you can use to upgrade.
Bill
2011-09-12 18:13:31 UTC
Permalink
In message <j4lgrm$324$***@dont-email.me>, Devany <***@devany.invalid>
writes
Post by Devany
Your cheap tablet is probably running v1.5 or 1.6.
There is a lot of difference.
Somewhere in xda-developers there is probably a ROM you can use to upgrade.
This one is running 2.2 and the bit of research I did seemed to indicate
that this ought to be stable and good enough to find my way around. It
plays YouTube videos fine, which seemed to be the thing to check.
It also looks to me as if the previous owner has replaced some of the
basic inbuilt apps with some slightly different, perhaps better
versions.

I realise it is basically a phone OS.

How little I know will be revealed by the next question. Am I right to
assume that when it says ROM, it actually means programmable
non-volatile RAM?
--
Bill
dennis@home
2011-09-12 20:26:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
writes
Post by Devany
Your cheap tablet is probably running v1.5 or 1.6.
There is a lot of difference.
Somewhere in xda-developers there is probably a ROM you can use to upgrade.
This one is running 2.2 and the bit of research I did seemed to indicate
that this ought to be stable and good enough to find my way around. It
plays YouTube videos fine, which seemed to be the thing to check.
It also looks to me as if the previous owner has replaced some of the
basic inbuilt apps with some slightly different, perhaps better versions.
I realise it is basically a phone OS.
You really want V3 on a tablet.
V2 is a phone OS.

V2.3.3 works well on my galaxy S2.
But the galaxy S2 probably has more RAM (1gig), more flash (16gig) and a
better CPU (1.2gig dual core) than most tablets ATM.
Post by Bill
How little I know will be revealed by the next question. Am I right to
assume that when it says ROM, it actually means programmable non-volatile
RAM?
Its (re)programmable ROM, usually flash these days.
Bob Eager
2011-09-12 21:11:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@home
Post by Bill
writes
Post by Devany
Your cheap tablet is probably running v1.5 or 1.6.
There is a lot of difference.
Somewhere in xda-developers there is probably a ROM you can use to upgrade.
This one is running 2.2 and the bit of research I did seemed to
indicate that this ought to be stable and good enough to find my way
around. It plays YouTube videos fine, which seemed to be the thing to
check. It also looks to me as if the previous owner has replaced some
of the basic inbuilt apps with some slightly different, perhaps better
versions.
I realise it is basically a phone OS.
You really want V3 on a tablet.
V2 is a phone OS.
V2.3.3 works well on my galaxy S2.
But the galaxy S2 probably has more RAM (1gig), more flash (16gig) and a
better CPU (1.2gig dual core) than most tablets ATM.
And very nice it is too. Plus the capability of adding another 32GB via
SD card....although I decided an extra 16GB was sufficient.
--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org

*lightning protection* - a w_tom conductor
Mark
2011-09-16 10:30:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob Eager
Post by ***@home
Post by Bill
writes
Post by Devany
Your cheap tablet is probably running v1.5 or 1.6.
There is a lot of difference.
Somewhere in xda-developers there is probably a ROM you can use to upgrade.
This one is running 2.2 and the bit of research I did seemed to
indicate that this ought to be stable and good enough to find my way
around. It plays YouTube videos fine, which seemed to be the thing to
check. It also looks to me as if the previous owner has replaced some
of the basic inbuilt apps with some slightly different, perhaps better
versions.
I realise it is basically a phone OS.
You really want V3 on a tablet.
V2 is a phone OS.
V2.3.3 works well on my galaxy S2.
But the galaxy S2 probably has more RAM (1gig), more flash (16gig) and a
better CPU (1.2gig dual core) than most tablets ATM.
And very nice it is too. Plus the capability of adding another 32GB via
SD card....although I decided an extra 16GB was sufficient.
Does the Galaxy S2 work OK? I've had so much trouble with the "S".
--
(\__/) M.
(='.'=) Due to the amount of spam posted via googlegroups and
(")_(") their inaction to the problem. I am blocking some articles
posted from there. If you wish your postings to be seen by
everyone you will need use a different method of posting.
Bob Eager
2011-09-16 16:34:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark
Post by Bob Eager
Post by ***@home
Post by Bill
Post by Devany
Your cheap tablet is probably running v1.5 or 1.6.
There is a lot of difference.
Somewhere in xda-developers there is probably a ROM you can use to upgrade.
This one is running 2.2 and the bit of research I did seemed to
indicate that this ought to be stable and good enough to find my way
around. It plays YouTube videos fine, which seemed to be the thing to
check. It also looks to me as if the previous owner has replaced some
of the basic inbuilt apps with some slightly different, perhaps
better versions.
I realise it is basically a phone OS.
You really want V3 on a tablet.
V2 is a phone OS.
V2.3.3 works well on my galaxy S2.
But the galaxy S2 probably has more RAM (1gig), more flash (16gig) and
a better CPU (1.2gig dual core) than most tablets ATM.
And very nice it is too. Plus the capability of adding another 32GB via
SD card....although I decided an extra 16GB was sufficient.
Does the Galaxy S2 work OK? I've had so much trouble with the "S".
I've had no trouble at all so far. So much nicer than the old Nokia!
--
Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org

*lightning protection* - a w_tom conductor
polygonum
2011-09-12 18:07:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
Post by Mike Barnes
I bought an iPad cheap on eBay to see what the fuss was about. It
quickly became part of the family. It lives in the kitchen and is used
for viewing web pages, as and when required. Before the iPad we used a
netbook but the iPad is a hundred times better.
I also use the iPad as a remote control for my home media server and
audio amplifier. Both of those applications involve a lot of extra
expenditure and I guess they wouldn't be of interest.
But just as a mobile domestic web browser, the iPad was worth the price.
I can see the value as a mobile web browser, and this Android thing has
already been used by family members who can't cope or don't want a PC in
the lounge.
My son has an iPhone and keeps telling me that the most useful app is
the ruler, so I found a free app in Android market called Smart Ruler
and installed it. Well, either my tape measure has shrunk or it's broke,
and I can't see any setup feature anywhere. Also, sometimes the search
works and sometimes not - eg not in Android Market.
This, and the difficulty in finding any clear guidance as to how apps
are supposed to be set up, is what made me think it's a bit of a toy.
I do appreciate that you get what you pay for and it is about an eighth
the price of an iPad.
I'm busy now watching the videos about writing apps for it and lurking
in the xda-developers forum.
I'll also look into Teamviewer (I use LogMeIn on the PC's, and assume
they can co-exist).
Thanks to all for the advice and suggestions.
Pretty much every day I connect using LogMeIn to computers which have
TeamViewer installed - and quite often in use.

And seeing as I am posting anyway, I have to recommend join.me for
occasional use - does not require anything to be pre-installed. From the
LogMeIn people and free. At last I can connect to the PCs of people who
are so computer-illterate that it is impossible to guide them through most
alternatives.
--
Rod
zaax
2011-09-20 22:51:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
How's this for stupidity? I "helped" a friend get his iPad2 connected to
his router and said "But what can you do with the Pad that the laptop
can't?",
Then I thought ..... better keep up to date and have a look at Android
(all I can afford) with perhaps a view to writing a little program to
remote control things over the network. So I have an Android emulator
running on a PC and have "run" the first couple of examples of how to
write apps.
My mobile phone is primitive, non Android and non-clever, so I'm
starting from a happy state of total ignorance. I went onto ebay and
invested in a cheap used Chinese 7" tablet. It seems to be one where all
the guts are made by Via and it works much better than I expected.
I realise these things are basically toys, but it looks to have some
potential if I can get past the poor instruction book. Is anyone using
one of these "as it comes" for anything useful and does anyone have any
recommendation for a website or even a book that is worth a visit?
Will it access the Android Market places directly?
--
zaax
Bill
2011-09-21 18:23:07 UTC
Permalink
In message <DN8eq.13679$***@newsfe06.ams2>, zaax <***@zaax.org>
writes
Post by zaax
Post by Bill
My mobile phone is primitive, non Android and non-clever, so I'm
starting from a happy state of total ignorance. I went onto ebay and
invested in a cheap used Chinese 7" tablet. It seems to be one where all
the guts are made by Via and it works much better than I expected.
Will it access the Android Market places directly?
Yes, it addresses the Android Market directly and I can download free
apps from there. The only thing that is a bit weird is that I can't
download, for example, the free Skype app because it says the phone is
not registered with Skype. Of course it isn't as it isn't a phone.
I haven't bothered looking into this.

I can "write" simple apps and install them via a usb memory stick, but I
still haven't sussed out how to "reverse" its usb to make it download
from a PC. I can't yet make the debug mode work.

So far, it is a long way from being perfect, but it is good enough to be
interesting.
--
Bill
MarkG
2011-10-24 21:42:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bill
writes
Post by zaax
Post by Bill
My mobile phone is primitive, non Android and non-clever, so I'm
starting from a happy state of total ignorance. I went onto ebay and=
invested in a cheap used Chinese 7" tablet. It seems to be one where=
=
Post by Bill
Post by zaax
Post by Bill
all
the guts are made by Via and it works much better than I expected.
Will it access the Android Market places directly?
Yes, it addresses the Android Market directly and I can download free =
=
Post by Bill
apps from there. The only thing that is a bit weird is that I can't =
download, for example, the free Skype app because it says the phone is=
=
Post by Bill
not registered with Skype. Of course it isn't as it isn't a phone.
I haven't bothered looking into this.
I can "write" simple apps and install them via a usb memory stick, but=
I =
Post by Bill
still haven't sussed out how to "reverse" its usb to make it download =
=
Post by Bill
from a PC. I can't yet make the debug mode work.
So far, it is a long way from being perfect, but it is good enough to =
be =
Post by Bill
interesting.
Of course Android offers the upmost in tablet scability, from =A399 chea=
pies =

with resistive touchscreens and less than ideal displays, all th way up =
to =

proper honeycomb tablets like the Asus Transformer (which is king of the=
=

tablets, including Apple ones).



-- =

Using Opera's revolutionary email client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
Bill
2011-10-24 23:56:28 UTC
Permalink
Of course Android offers the upmost in tablet scability, from £99
cheapies with resistive touchscreens and less than ideal displays, all
th way up to proper honeycomb tablets like the Asus Transformer (which
is king of the tablets, including Apple ones).
Just a small update. I ended up having to blow away the "OS" and load a
later version after a failed attempt to load and run a "live" Debian
Linux on my £50 tablet.
Debian actually loaded and ran and the "mouse pointer" was controllable,
but didn't respond to any screen or mouse clicks. Loading it appeared to
have messed with the "bios" if it has such a thing, hence the need to
start again.

I haven't had much time to play recently, but it now works well as a
small internet device to provide a handy "look at this" thing for guests
on the sofa. Navigation to and downloading of apps now works, although
many of them still think it's a phone and say it is not registered as
such.

There are obviously masses of these VIA-based tablets around and the
hardware seems very good, but I'm surprised that there doesn't seem to
be a standard "does all the basics" set of software. Everyone seems to
be relying on hacked versions of the firmware. Apparently the hack I'm
running doesn't support Debian.

The resistive screen seems "good enough" for what I want to do in terms
of readability and finger response..
--
Bill
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