Discussion:
Thoughts on insulation (garden building, storage/workshop).
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Chris Bacon
2021-10-13 17:48:58 UTC
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Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.

It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm - under
ply, finished with laminate flooring.

The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.

Above the plasterboard ceiling, there will be some sort of insulation.

The four doors are another thing; steel frames (square hollow section,
40mm I think), with flat sheets of galvanised attached. They will need
some insulation too. Perhaps fit insulation in and board it over with ply.

This all needs to be cheap; best "bang for buck".

So, I ws thinking of laying 25mm EPS floor insulation sheets, fitting
further 25mm floor insulation between the posts (as it's non-absorbent
re water), inside/over the concrete wall slabs, then having 50mm of
rockwool sanswiched between the EPS and plasterboard. Above the ceiling,
I could lay ordinary glass fibe or rockwool loft insulation, perhaps
150mm thick. The doors could have 50mm rockwool or similar I suppose.


Any comments on effectiveness, or any cheaper useful insulation, please?
Brian
2021-10-13 18:14:42 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm - under
ply, finished with laminate flooring.
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.
Above the plasterboard ceiling, there will be some sort of insulation.
The four doors are another thing; steel frames (square hollow section,
40mm I think), with flat sheets of galvanised attached. They will need
some insulation too. Perhaps fit insulation in and board it over with ply.
This all needs to be cheap; best "bang for buck".
So, I ws thinking of laying 25mm EPS floor insulation sheets, fitting
further 25mm floor insulation between the posts (as it's non-absorbent
re water), inside/over the concrete wall slabs, then having 50mm of
rockwool sanswiched between the EPS and plasterboard. Above the ceiling,
I could lay ordinary glass fibe or rockwool loft insulation, perhaps
150mm thick. The doors could have 50mm rockwool or similar I suppose.
Any comments on effectiveness, or any cheaper useful insulation, please?
Condensation and other sources of moisture will be a problem with rock
wool, it acts like a sponge and concrete tends to allow moisture through-
not to mention moisture from inside.

I’d line with something impermeable both sides of the rock wool to keep it
dry. I’ve used rock wool ‘batts’ in the past, they are easier to work with.
I think they are intended for cavity walls.

I’ve seen loft insulation which is in a roll but in a huge foil bag - as
you roll it out it stays in a roll. You would need to seal it where you cut
- Gaffer tape?
Chris Bacon
2021-10-13 19:24:25 UTC
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Post by Brian
Condensation and other sources of moisture will be a problem with rock
wool, it acts like a sponge and concrete tends to allow moisture through-
not to mention moisture from inside.
I’d line with something impermeable both sides of the rock wool to keep it
dry. I’ve used rock wool ‘batts’ in the past, they are easier to work with.
I think they are intended for cavity walls.
I’ve seen loft insulation which is in a roll but in a huge foil bag - as
you roll it out it stays in a roll. You would need to seal it where you cut
- Gaffer tape?
Thank you - hence the reason for wanting EPS board on the outer side.
The roof overhang is about 130mm. I have run frame sealant long the
horizontal joints. The inside (floor, ceiling, walls) will have a layer
of Visqueen just behing the finishing surfaces of plasterboard & ply.

For gap sealing, I am thinking "expanding foam".
Andrew
2021-10-14 12:56:03 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Post by Brian
Condensation and other sources of moisture will be a problem with rock
wool, it acts like a sponge and concrete tends to allow moisture through-
not to mention moisture from inside.
I’d line with something impermeable both sides of the rock wool to keep it
dry. I’ve used rock wool ‘batts’ in the past, they are easier to work with.
I think they are intended for cavity walls.
I’ve seen loft insulation which is in a roll but in a huge foil bag - as
you roll it out it stays in a roll. You would need to seal it where you cut
- Gaffer tape?
Thank you - hence the reason for wanting EPS board on the outer side.
The roof overhang is about 130mm. I have run frame sealant long the
horizontal joints. The inside (floor, ceiling, walls) will have a layer
of Visqueen just behing the finishing surfaces of plasterboard & ply.
For gap sealing, I am thinking "expanding foam".
EPS is 'cheap' but it is 'open cell', so if you use it under the floor
it needs to be protected from damp or even water penetration with an
effective DPC under the insulation. 'Celotex' and Extruded polystyrene
are closed cell. They can go under the DPC.
Theo
2021-10-13 21:16:05 UTC
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Post by Brian
I’ve seen loft insulation which is in a roll but in a huge foil bag - as
you roll it out it stays in a roll. You would need to seal it where you cut
- Gaffer tape?
When I looked for that last year, it appeared to be priced at 3x the price
of regular rockwool insulation, and unobtainable without lots of faff.

So what I've got is regular rockwool plus this stuff:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/153701828982
and a stapler.

Haven't fitted it yet, so don't know how it goes.

(The use case is insulation where I need to regularly move it to access
things underneath. Unwrapped rockwool would be a bit of a dustfest)

Theo
Tricky Dicky
2021-10-14 13:18:47 UTC
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Post by Brian
Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm - under
ply, finished with laminate flooring.
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.
Above the plasterboard ceiling, there will be some sort of insulation.
The four doors are another thing; steel frames (square hollow section,
40mm I think), with flat sheets of galvanised attached. They will need
some insulation too. Perhaps fit insulation in and board it over with ply.
This all needs to be cheap; best "bang for buck".
So, I ws thinking of laying 25mm EPS floor insulation sheets, fitting
further 25mm floor insulation between the posts (as it's non-absorbent
re water), inside/over the concrete wall slabs, then having 50mm of
rockwool sanswiched between the EPS and plasterboard. Above the ceiling,
I could lay ordinary glass fibe or rockwool loft insulation, perhaps
150mm thick. The doors could have 50mm rockwool or similar I suppose.
Any comments on effectiveness, or any cheaper useful insulation, please?
Condensation and other sources of moisture will be a problem with rock
wool, it acts like a sponge and concrete tends to allow moisture through-
not to mention moisture from inside.
I’d line with something impermeable both sides of the rock wool to keep it
dry. I’ve used rock wool ‘batts’ in the past, they are easier to work with.
I think they are intended for cavity walls.
I’ve seen loft insulation which is in a roll but in a huge foil bag - as
you roll it out it stays in a roll. You would need to seal it where you cut
- Gaffer tape?
Got to agree about concrete letting moisture in although condensation is your main issue with concrete walls.

If you don’t mind losing a few inches of the room size have you considered building a studded structure around the walls stood off from the concrete to provide an air gap. Depending on how you brace it the structure could be free standing yet strong enough to fix shelves etc. To it. PIR could be pushed in between the studs a vapour barrier on the inside and PB to clad it. For belt and braces a few holes core drilled through the concrete panels would allow ventilation of the air gap. Just remember to stand the frames on a DPC just in case your concrete base does not have a DPM.

Richard
n***@aolbin.com
2021-10-13 18:16:39 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm - under
ply, finished with laminate flooring.
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.
Above the plasterboard ceiling, there will be some sort of insulation.
The four doors are another thing; steel frames (square hollow section,
40mm I think), with flat sheets of galvanised attached. They will need
some insulation too. Perhaps fit insulation in and board it over with ply.
This all needs to be cheap; best "bang for buck".
So, I ws thinking of laying 25mm EPS floor insulation sheets, fitting
further 25mm floor insulation between the posts (as it's non-absorbent
re water), inside/over the concrete wall slabs, then having 50mm of
rockwool sanswiched between the EPS and plasterboard. Above the ceiling,
I could lay ordinary glass fibe or rockwool loft insulation, perhaps
150mm thick. The doors could have 50mm rockwool or similar I suppose.
Any comments on effectiveness, or any cheaper useful insulation, please?
For cheap insulation: https://www.secondsandco.co.uk/
Chris Bacon
2021-10-14 12:39:34 UTC
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Post by n***@aolbin.com
For cheap insulation: https://www.secondsandco.co.uk/
That's actually sort-of attractive. Unfortunately, £550 incl. delivery,
for 60/65mm boards, or pallets which don't give a very good match. Maybe
there's another supplier.
Theo
2021-10-16 11:33:08 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Post by n***@aolbin.com
For cheap insulation: https://www.secondsandco.co.uk/
That's actually sort-of attractive. Unfortunately, £550 incl. delivery,
for 60/65mm boards, or pallets which don't give a very good match. Maybe
there's another supplier.
Where are you? Searching 'PIR seconds' comes up with a number of suppliers
- I suspect a big chunk of the cost is delivery, so if you have a local one
the cost will come down.

Theo
Chris Bacon
2021-10-16 11:53:05 UTC
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Post by Theo
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by n***@aolbin.com
For cheap insulation: https://www.secondsandco.co.uk/
That's actually sort-of attractive. Unfortunately, £550 incl. delivery,
for 60/65mm boards, or pallets which don't give a very good match. Maybe
there's another supplier.
Where are you? Searching 'PIR seconds' comes up with a number of suppliers
- I suspect a big chunk of the cost is delivery, so if you have a local one
the cost will come down.
Buckingham-ish.
John Rumm
2021-10-13 19:25:48 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm - under
ply, finished with laminate flooring.
I would do EPS on the floor under the ply, but also stick a layer of
visqueen sheet in there to stop an moisture getting through from the hot
wet side to the cold side. (EPS alone does not form a perfect vapour
barrier).
Post by Chris Bacon
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.
Foil faced PIR foam boards - either as thick as will fit or you want to
spend. IME 2" is fine for this application - you could probably get away
with less. Tape up any joints with ali foil tape. You don't necessarily
need any timber behind it - you can fix the ply face right through to
the concrete. The PIR boards won't crush.
Post by Chris Bacon
Above the plasterboard ceiling, there will be some sort of insulation.
Anything cheap - so rockwool since it does not need to be pretty and you
don't care if it takes 8". If it's a "cold deck" roof, then you could
use foil backed PB.
Post by Chris Bacon
The four doors are another thing; steel frames (square hollow section,
40mm I think), with flat sheets of galvanised attached. They will need
some insulation too. Perhaps fit insulation in and board it over with ply.
25mm PIR boards bonded on with "board fix" PU foam, then ply (also
bonded if you want)
Post by Chris Bacon
This all needs to be cheap; best "bang for buck".
Understood, but don't go too cheap since you will be living with this,
and are unlikely to want to do it again. Energy costs are unlikely to
get cheaper. Also if its a warn dry space that is pleasant to use you
will likely get more use out of it since it will be nicer being in there.
Post by Chris Bacon
Any comments on effectiveness, or any cheaper useful insulation, please?
My first small workshop I did with 2" EPS all over - it was ok. The
current one with 2" PIR foil faced boards, and it is noticeably better.

(I think I paid £300 for a "van load" of boards from our local "seconds"
supplier - but that was 12 years ago!).

That did all the walls of the 17x12' space and the complete roof apex
and gable ends.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Theo
2021-10-13 21:27:41 UTC
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Post by John Rumm
Anything cheap - so rockwool since it does not need to be pretty and you
don't care if it takes 8". If it's a "cold deck" roof, then you could
use foil backed PB.
Be aware of planning though - if this is under permitted development rules
the height is maximum 2.5m. Things get a bit tight when you start adding
all the layers.

This guy does really solid garden room builds on Youtube, and has a 'hybrid'
roof construction to keep the height down. I'm not completely convinced by
his approach because of the cold bridging, but understand it's tricky due to
the height restriction. Here's the explanation of his approach:


Post by John Rumm
(I think I paid £300 for a "van load" of boards from our local "seconds"
supplier - but that was 12 years ago!).
Seconds and Co is the most well known, but there are other 'seconds' PIR
vendors around which might be nearer to you. PIR insulation is basically
mostly transport costs, so it could be worth hunting around to see if
there's a seconds seller close to you (especially if you have a factory
nearby).

Theo
John Rumm
2021-10-13 22:41:39 UTC
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Post by Theo
Post by John Rumm
Anything cheap - so rockwool since it does not need to be pretty and you
don't care if it takes 8". If it's a "cold deck" roof, then you could
use foil backed PB.
Be aware of planning though - if this is under permitted development rules
the height is maximum 2.5m. Things get a bit tight when you start adding
all the layers.
I think the building's shell is complete, so this will all be "inside".
Post by Theo
This guy does really solid garden room builds on Youtube, and has a 'hybrid'
roof construction to keep the height down. I'm not completely convinced by
his approach because of the cold bridging, but understand it's tricky due to
http://youtu.be/UbEhksYjkCs
Post by John Rumm
(I think I paid £300 for a "van load" of boards from our local "seconds"
supplier - but that was 12 years ago!).
Seconds and Co is the most well known, but there are other 'seconds' PIR
vendors around which might be nearer to you. PIR insulation is basically
mostly transport costs, so it could be worth hunting around to see if
there's a seconds seller close to you (especially if you have a factory
nearby).
Yup the local one in Benfleet was called APCO insulation - but I am not
sure if they still exist.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Chris Bacon
2021-10-14 12:18:42 UTC
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Post by John Rumm
My first small workshop I did with 2" EPS all over - it was ok. The
current one with 2" PIR foil faced boards, and it is noticeably better.
(I think I paid £300 for a "van load" of boards from our local "seconds"
supplier - but that was 12 years ago!).
That did all the walls of the 17x12' space and the complete roof apex
and gable ends.
Thank you, that is interesting. Looking at the "bays" betwen the posts,
it's possible that I could use 75mm thick EPS (~£4215), or 25mm + 50mm
EPS (~£397, would be much easier to fit), or 25mm EPS + 50mm Rockwool
(~£300). So using rockwool I would save about £100, all else being
equal, with not much difference ininsulation value.

Another possible problem is the spacing of the vertical timbers against
the posts - they're on (about) 870mm centres, so further studwork to
support the plasterboard will interfere with the insulation. Hm.
John Rumm
2021-10-14 15:21:33 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Post by John Rumm
My first small workshop I did with 2" EPS all over - it was ok. The
current one with 2" PIR foil faced boards, and it is noticeably better.
(I think I paid £300 for a "van load" of boards from our local
"seconds" supplier - but that was 12 years ago!).
That did all the walls of the 17x12' space and the complete roof apex
and gable ends.
Thank you, that is interesting. Looking at the "bays" betwen the posts,
it's possible that I could use 75mm thick EPS (~£4215), or 25mm + 50mm
EPS (~£397, would be much easier to fit), or 25mm EPS + 50mm Rockwool
(~£300). So using rockwool I would save about £100, all else being
equal, with not much difference ininsulation value.
Another possible problem is the spacing of the vertical timbers against
the posts - they're on (about) 870mm centres, so further studwork to
support the plasterboard will interfere with the insulation. Hm.
Use ply instead of PB and fix through the insulation to the concrete...
(will only work on something not easily compressible like Jablite or
PIR). No studs needed then (and less thermal bridging)
--
Cheers,

John.

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Andrew
2021-10-16 12:13:27 UTC
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Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when
it's winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm -
under ply, finished with laminate flooring.
I would do EPS on the floor under the ply, but also stick a layer of
visqueen sheet in there to stop an moisture getting through from the hot
wet side to the cold side.  (EPS alone does not form a perfect vapour
barrier).
if there is no DPC under the existing floor, which is quite likely
then he needs to stop damp coming up from the ground and getting
inside the EPS. Cousin made this mistake when he insulated a big
shed and over a period of about 10 years the EPS just slowly
disintegrated allowing the overlaid flooring to sag in places.

Maybe spend a bit more and use 'celotex' as flooring insulation.
RJH
2021-10-14 06:20:08 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm - under
ply, finished with laminate flooring.
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.
Is plasterboard the best way to go? I'd prefer something that doesn't absorb
moisture, provide a decent fixing point for shelves, tool hooks etc., and
could take a few knocks - treated OSB probably.
--
Cheers, Rob
The Natural Philosopher
2021-10-14 09:10:42 UTC
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Post by RJH
Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm - under
ply, finished with laminate flooring.
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.
Is plasterboard the best way to go? I'd prefer something that doesn't absorb
moisture, provide a decent fixing point for shelves, tool hooks etc., and
could take a few knocks - treated OSB probably.
A couple of my walls are actually MDF - 12 mm I think. Might be 18.

Fantastic surface to mount stuff on.

takes emulsion paint well.
--
“People believe certain stories because everyone important tells them,
and people tell those stories because everyone important believes them.
Indeed, when a conventional wisdom is at its fullest strength, one’s
agreement with that conventional wisdom becomes almost a litmus test of
one’s suitability to be taken seriously.”

Paul Krugman
Chris Bacon
2021-10-14 12:00:46 UTC
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Post by RJH
Post by Chris Bacon
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.
Is plasterboard the best way to go? I'd prefer something that doesn't absorb
moisture, provide a decent fixing point for shelves, tool hooks etc., and
could take a few knocks - treated OSB probably.
It's cheap. The building will be dry (I very much hope!). Again, even
9mm OSB, which I would not hang shelves on, is 3x the price. Shelves
will be free-standing, with safety retainers if need be.
Brian Gaff (Sofa)
2021-10-14 06:56:17 UTC
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Are there any windows?. I'm thinking of getting a new shed of some kind but
a bit out of the loop these days.
As I recall draftee doors and windows were the issue with my old wooden one
when it was new.

Brian
--
This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
The Sofa of Brian Gaff...
***@blueyonder.co.uk
Blind user, so no pictures please
Note this Signature is meaningless.!
Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm - under
ply, finished with laminate flooring.
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The posts
are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove" between
posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving another
~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with plasterboard.
Above the plasterboard ceiling, there will be some sort of insulation.
The four doors are another thing; steel frames (square hollow section,
40mm I think), with flat sheets of galvanised attached. They will need
some insulation too. Perhaps fit insulation in and board it over with ply.
This all needs to be cheap; best "bang for buck".
So, I ws thinking of laying 25mm EPS floor insulation sheets, fitting
further 25mm floor insulation between the posts (as it's non-absorbent re
water), inside/over the concrete wall slabs, then having 50mm of rockwool
sanswiched between the EPS and plasterboard. Above the ceiling, I could
lay ordinary glass fibe or rockwool loft insulation, perhaps 150mm thick.
The doors could have 50mm rockwool or similar I suppose.
Any comments on effectiveness, or any cheaper useful insulation, please?
Chris Bacon
2021-10-14 11:58:01 UTC
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Post by Brian Gaff (Sofa)
Are there any windows?. I'm thinking of getting a new shed of some kind but
a bit out of the loop these days.
As I recall draftee doors and windows were the issue with my old wooden one
when it was new.
No, no windows. Four steel-framed doors along the front, though.... they
will need insulating and draught-proofing.
Tim Lamb
2021-10-14 08:32:50 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Yes, it's this again. It does not need to be superinsulated, nor
continually heated, just enough so that being in it sometimes when it's
winter is reasonable.
It's going to get a rather thin layer of floor insulation - 25mm -
under ply, finished with laminate flooring.
The walls are thin concrete slabs, fitted between slotted posts. The
posts are thicker than the slabs between, so there's 25mm of "alcove"
between posts. The posts will have 2x2 vertically against them, leaving
another ~45mm of space to fill with insulation, finished with
plasterboard.
Above the plasterboard ceiling, there will be some sort of insulation.
The four doors are another thing; steel frames (square hollow section,
40mm I think), with flat sheets of galvanised attached. They will need
some insulation too. Perhaps fit insulation in and board it over with ply.
This all needs to be cheap; best "bang for buck".
So, I ws thinking of laying 25mm EPS floor insulation sheets, fitting
further 25mm floor insulation between the posts (as it's non-absorbent
re water), inside/over the concrete wall slabs, then having 50mm of
rockwool sanswiched between the EPS and plasterboard. Above the
ceiling, I could lay ordinary glass fibe or rockwool loft insulation,
perhaps 150mm thick. The doors could have 50mm rockwool or similar I
suppose.
Check the specification buying Rockwool.

Glass fibre manufacturers have re-named their product to confuse.
Earthwool etc.:-(
Post by Chris Bacon
Any comments on effectiveness, or any cheaper useful insulation, please?
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
--
Tim Lamb
Chris Bacon
2021-10-14 11:56:32 UTC
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Post by Tim Lamb
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
I'm sure. Marine ply would also be an improvement. However, I can get a
sheet of 12.5mm plasterboard for about £7.50. 18mm softwood ply is about
£42, 12mm about £33. I'm going to need 14/15 just for the walls.
John Rumm
2021-10-14 15:23:16 UTC
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Post by Chris Bacon
Post by Tim Lamb
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
I'm sure. Marine ply would also be an improvement. However, I can get a
sheet of 12.5mm plasterboard for about £7.50. 18mm softwood ply is about
£42, 12mm about £33. I'm going to need 14/15 just for the walls.
Shuttering ply is cheaper than normal WBP... (but still is WBP - just
not as pretty looking)
--
Cheers,

John.

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Chris Bacon
2021-10-14 15:39:06 UTC
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Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by Tim Lamb
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
I'm sure. Marine ply would also be an improvement. However, I can get
a sheet of 12.5mm plasterboard for about £7.50. 18mm softwood ply is
about £42, 12mm about £33. I'm going to need 14/15 just for the walls.
Shuttering ply is cheaper than normal WBP... (but still is WBP - just
not as pretty looking)
As in the prices above.
John Rumm
2021-10-14 15:57:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by Tim Lamb
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
I'm sure. Marine ply would also be an improvement. However, I can get
a sheet of 12.5mm plasterboard for about £7.50. 18mm softwood ply is
about £42, 12mm about £33. I'm going to need 14/15 just for the walls.
Shuttering ply is cheaper than normal WBP... (but still is WBP - just
not as pretty looking)
As in the prices above.
Not a good time to be buying materials - ply is 60% up on this time last
year. You may get a better price from a decent timber merchant.
Buildbase are showing 9mm OSB3 at ~£27 if you buy 7 or more sheets.

Alternatively, insulate with PIR boards for now and clad them later when
the prices are not as daft.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Chris Bacon
2021-10-14 16:17:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by Tim Lamb
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
I'm sure. Marine ply would also be an improvement. However, I can
get a sheet of 12.5mm plasterboard for about £7.50. 18mm softwood
ply is about £42, 12mm about £33. I'm going to need 14/15 just for
the walls.
Shuttering ply is cheaper than normal WBP... (but still is WBP - just
not as pretty looking)
As in the prices above.
Not a good time to be buying materials - ply is 60% up on this time last
year. You may get a better price from a decent timber merchant.
Buildbase are showing 9mm OSB3 at ~£27 if you buy 7 or more sheets.
Alternatively, insulate with PIR boards for now and clad them later when
the prices are not as daft.
Buildbase is where I buy stuff generally, although bizarrely TP were
cheaper for 14 bags of ballast and a pallet of cement. The prices above
ae Buildbase ones, too. Anyway, I could get 9mm OSB there at ~£23, but
that's still three times the price of plasterboard!
Andrew
2021-10-16 12:19:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by Tim Lamb
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
I'm sure. Marine ply would also be an improvement. However, I can
get a sheet of 12.5mm plasterboard for about £7.50. 18mm softwood
ply is about £42, 12mm about £33. I'm going to need 14/15 just for
the walls.
Shuttering ply is cheaper than normal WBP... (but still is WBP -
just not as pretty looking)
As in the prices above.
Not a good time to be buying materials - ply is 60% up on this time
last year. You may get a better price from a decent timber merchant.
Buildbase are showing 9mm OSB3 at ~£27 if you buy 7 or more sheets.
Alternatively, insulate with PIR boards for now and clad them later
when the prices are not as daft.
Buildbase is where I buy stuff generally, although bizarrely TP were
cheaper for 14 bags of ballast and a pallet of cement. The prices above
ae Buildbase ones, too. Anyway, I could get 9mm OSB there at ~£23, but
that's still three times the price of plasterboard!
Blimey, I paid £23 for 18mm OSB3 in 2018 !!

Chris Bacon
2021-10-14 17:54:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by John Rumm
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by Tim Lamb
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
I'm sure. Marine ply would also be an improvement. However, I can
get a sheet of 12.5mm plasterboard for about £7.50. 18mm softwood
ply is about £42, 12mm about £33. I'm going to need 14/15 just for
the walls.
Shuttering ply is cheaper than normal WBP... (but still is WBP - just
not as pretty looking)
As in the prices above.
Not a good time to be buying materials - ply is 60% up on this time last
year. You may get a better price from a decent timber merchant.
Buildbase are showing 9mm OSB3 at ~£27 if you buy 7 or more sheets.
Alternatively, insulate with PIR boards for now and clad them later when
the prices are not as daft.
Here's the situation now:

Loading Image...
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The idea being (currently( cut 25mm Jabfloor to fit the nays between the
posts, resting on the cement fillet at the bottom, and hve 2x2s between
the barren inboard of the fillet to the angler irons of the roof
trusses, ensuring it's sealed around with PU foam. Then go on the
Jabfloor with rockwool, and plasterboard finish. Some extra timber may
be required to support the plasterboard, I'd rather not hold it at 34"
centres, but 17" would be OK.
Andrew
2021-10-16 12:17:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris Bacon
Post by Tim Lamb
Shuttering ply might be better than plasterboard for your uses.
I'm sure. Marine ply would also be an improvement. However, I can get a
sheet of 12.5mm plasterboard for about £7.50. 18mm softwood ply is about
£42, 12mm about £33. I'm going to need 14/15 just for the walls.
18mm OSB3 is (or was) half the price of 18mm ply though.
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