Discussion:
Comments on Spare Wheel Alternatives
(too old to reply)
TheChief
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Hi all

We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.

Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.

I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.

Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?

Thanks

Phil


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Andy Burns
2017-12-30 14:57:09 UTC
Permalink
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model. > This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.> > Does anyone
have experience of using this type of thing?
My previous car came with the compressor+gunk, the former was handy to
have, but it wasn't even worth considering using the latter the time I
needed a proper spare, had to be recovered off the motorway, and made
sure the next car at least had a space-saver, will never have gunk again.
Brian Reay
2017-12-30 15:10:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Thanks
Phil
I'd but a spare wheel. There are companies which supply 'space saver'
ones if you don't have space for a 'proper' one.

We've bought several, well a 'proper' one several years back and a
couple of space savers more recently. We used the proper one, once.
Touch wood, as they say, not yet needed the other two.

The idea of being stuck with a type the 'gunk' can't fix or writing off
a tyre because I've used 'gunk' and the tyre place doesn't like it just
doesn't appeal. Plus one of the cars is used in Europe- we tow it one a
trailer behind a motorhome. The idea of being stuck in France/Germany
etc with a duff tyre doesn't appeal.

I've looked at some 'plug' things but I not convinced they are legal or
safe. I know they were around in the earlier days of tubeless tyres but
understood they were banned. I now see they are sold on Ebay and there
are various details on YouTube. I'm not convinced.
T i m
2017-12-30 15:42:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 15:10:08 +0000, Brian Reay <***@m.com> wrote:

<snip>
Post by Brian Reay
The idea of being stuck with a type the 'gunk' can't fix or writing off
a tyre because I've used 'gunk' and the tyre place doesn't like it just
doesn't appeal.
<snip>

But as with all these things, not all 'gunks' are created equal Brian.
;-(

For example, I gave half a container of Punctureseal to a mate to
retrospectively fix a puncture in one of his motorcycle tyres (which
it did) and so the felt he should replace it but without realising it,
got the wrong (similar sounding / looking) thing. I just assumed it
was a re-vamp of the same product and after a while, used it to help
our daughters BF out (and retrospectively) on the rear tyre of his
motorcyle. Long / short, after applying way over the right quantity of
said sealant to the tyre over a few goes, it didn't reliably fix it.
;-(

I have use Punctureseal retrospectively on 5 vehicles now and it has
resolved the puncture in all cases for the full life of the tyre.

So, unlike you, I personally wouldn't feel safe going out *without*
having this particular 'gunk' in my vehicles and the Meriva is still
running fine after treating one tyre (retrospectively) for a puncture
some time back now (I did the other tyres while I was at it). ;-)

Oh, and no tyre place has ever batted an eye when they have removed a
treated tyre and seen the 'gunk'. A possible reason being I wasn't
taking it there to fix a puncture (I've not had one so far with a
treated tyre <touch wood>) and if I had been for some reason, the
stuff just washes out with a hose on in the sink. <shrug>

So, I'm not talking about all 'gunks' here, I'm specifically and only
talking about Punctureseal. At a lower level I have also used the
product called 'Slime' on cycle tyres and that also seems to work ok
and I'm sure others will be able to bring their positive experiences
with other products.

Cheers, T i m

http://www.punctureseal.com/motorhomes.html
Brian Gaff
2017-12-30 16:21:22 UTC
Permalink
Well not exactly good names for products though, are they? Is this some kind
of reverse snobbery on the tyre front?
Brian
--
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This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
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Blind user, so no pictures please!
Post by T i m
<snip>
Post by Brian Reay
The idea of being stuck with a type the 'gunk' can't fix or writing off
a tyre because I've used 'gunk' and the tyre place doesn't like it just
doesn't appeal.
<snip>
But as with all these things, not all 'gunks' are created equal Brian.
;-(
For example, I gave half a container of Punctureseal to a mate to
retrospectively fix a puncture in one of his motorcycle tyres (which
it did) and so the felt he should replace it but without realising it,
got the wrong (similar sounding / looking) thing. I just assumed it
was a re-vamp of the same product and after a while, used it to help
our daughters BF out (and retrospectively) on the rear tyre of his
motorcyle. Long / short, after applying way over the right quantity of
said sealant to the tyre over a few goes, it didn't reliably fix it.
;-(
I have use Punctureseal retrospectively on 5 vehicles now and it has
resolved the puncture in all cases for the full life of the tyre.
So, unlike you, I personally wouldn't feel safe going out *without*
having this particular 'gunk' in my vehicles and the Meriva is still
running fine after treating one tyre (retrospectively) for a puncture
some time back now (I did the other tyres while I was at it). ;-)
Oh, and no tyre place has ever batted an eye when they have removed a
treated tyre and seen the 'gunk'. A possible reason being I wasn't
taking it there to fix a puncture (I've not had one so far with a
treated tyre <touch wood>) and if I had been for some reason, the
stuff just washes out with a hose on in the sink. <shrug>
So, I'm not talking about all 'gunks' here, I'm specifically and only
talking about Punctureseal. At a lower level I have also used the
product called 'Slime' on cycle tyres and that also seems to work ok
and I'm sure others will be able to bring their positive experiences
with other products.
Cheers, T i m
http://www.punctureseal.com/motorhomes.html
T i m
2017-12-30 16:48:04 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 16:21:22 -0000, "Brian Gaff"
Post by Brian Gaff
Well not exactly good names for products though, are they?
Are you talking about Gunge and Slime Brian? If so I think 'Gunge' is
just a generic term people tend to use for such things and 'Slime' is
a fairly accurate description for what it is, it may also be
considered 'hip' in the cycling world?
Post by Brian Gaff
Is this some kind
of reverse snobbery on the tyre front?
I don't think so, I just think it's one of those things. ;-)

Cheers, T i m
T i m
2017-12-30 15:24:45 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 14:47:01 +0000 (GMT+00:00), TheChief
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I would say 'badly' and for good reason (you wouldn't want to travel
*any* distance on a damaged tyre).

That said, I saw someone stab a fairly large pocket knife blade into a
motorcycle tyre (at a motorcycle show / demonstration <g>) and whilst
I'm pretty sure it wasn't part of the demo, the sealant held air
pressure ok (Punctureseal) but that wasn't one of the 'get you home'
foams, this was something you pre-treat the tyres with.

http://www.punctureseal.com/car.html
Post by TheChief
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Partly for the reason you state above ... and simply because none of
us want to get caught out with a small puncture that slowly turns in a
deflated tyre and a blowout (especially on our trailers etc) or being
on a busy road at night and in the rain (punctures rarely happen at
any other times), all our vehicles are treated with Punctureseal.

Whilst we have never had a puncture (that we know of <g>) since
running with Punctureseal, I have used it retrospectively (not really
how it was designed to work) at least 5 times now and with 100%
success (2 x motorbike and 3 x car).

If the concept is good enough for Continental tyres ...

https://www.continental-tyres.co.uk/car/technology/extended-mobility-main/contiseal


Please don't confuse Punctureseal with any other products (even with a
similar name) and especially the latex foams that are supposed to get
you home (that may or may not work, I've never used them personally).

Oh, and because Punctureseal is water soluble (when not cured etc) it
*can* be easily washed out of a tyre (I've done so on one that had
been filled for 7 years), not that you should ever need to. I've also
transferred some over between tyres, again, not 'recommended' as such
but not against it's practical use either.

The stuff isn't 'cheap' as such (~£7/ tyre I think we calculated last
time), but the insurance often isn't, but it's the peace of mind you
might enjoy, especially for those less equipped / able to change a
wheel safely and un-assisted (and of course the price goes down if you
buy larger quantities). I bet few would question even 50 quid / car /
set of tyres if it even stopped you having to change one spare wheel
or get one puncture repaired, especially when it could be dangerous to
do so (motorway / dual carriageway etc), or simply inconvinient.

There isn't really anything that would (should) protect against a
badly damaged tyre and I think only runflats sound be expected to even
get close (and then should be replaced in any case and can still get
punctures of course).

Cheers, T i m

p.s. No connection, just very happy and long term user. YMMV. ;-)
Huge
2017-12-30 16:37:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
They don't.
Post by TheChief
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
SWMBO's car has no spare. That bothered me. But then, when did you
last have a flat tire? 1990-something, in my case.
--
Today is Prickle-Prickle, the 72nd day of The Aftermath in the YOLD 3183
Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
Dave Plowman (News)
2017-12-30 17:23:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Huge
SWMBO's car has no spare. That bothered me. But then, when did you
last have a flat tire? 1990-something, in my case.
I've had to buy two new tyres in the past couple of months. Due to screws
in them. Neither actually went flat, but both scrap even with lots of
tread left. Over 200 quid a pop.
--
*If at first you do succeed, try not to look too astonished.

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
T i m
2017-12-30 17:28:11 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 17:23:05 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by Huge
SWMBO's car has no spare. That bothered me. But then, when did you
last have a flat tire? 1990-something, in my case.
I've had to buy two new tyres in the past couple of months. Due to screws
in them. Neither actually went flat, but both scrap even with lots of
tread left.
Was this because the damage was too near the sidewall?
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Over 200 quid a pop.
Ouch.

Cheers, T i m
harry
2017-12-30 16:43:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
It won't fix any kind of gash, even a small one.
Only does nail holes etc.
Works good on nail holes.

The good news is, after you've used it, they won't repair the puncture, you have to buy a new tyre.
T i m
2017-12-30 16:55:43 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 08:43:33 -0800 (PST), harry
<***@btinternet.com> wrote:

<snip>
Post by harry
It won't fix any kind of gash, even a small one.
Only does nail holes etc.
Works good on nail holes.
(Punctureseal) Works very well on nail holes, even if they are fairly
big ones (up to 6mm diameter I believe).
Post by harry
The good news is, after you've used it, they won't repair the puncture, you have to buy a new tyre.
And the advantage of stuff like Punctureseal, they *will* repair the
tyre (if you felt the need). ;-)

Cheers, T i m
T i m
2017-12-31 00:38:56 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 08:43:33 -0800 (PST), harry
Post by harry
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
It won't fix any kind of gash, even a small one.
Only does nail holes etc.
Works good on nail holes.
The good news is, after you've used it, they won't repair the puncture, you have to buy a new tyre.
Depending on what 'it' is maybe?

https://www.holtsauto.com/holts/products/tyreweld/

“Unlike some of our competitors, Holts Tyreweld does not damage your
tyres. After using Tyreweld, the puncture can be repaired according to
the British standard BS AU159:f.”

Cheers, T i m
Dave Plowman (News)
2017-12-30 17:21:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Yes. Even if you can't change a wheel yourself, the AA etc can. If the
tyre can't be fixed by that kit. Otherwise means having the car towed home.

Other thing I've been told is that if you use that gunk, a simple puncture
can't be properly repaired. But dunno for sure.

I've got the same problem here. But my car has little room for a spare, so
perhaps more justified.
--
*The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on my list.

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
T i m
2017-12-30 17:49:56 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 17:21:11 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by TheChief
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Yes. Even if you can't change a wheel yourself, the AA etc can. If the
tyre can't be fixed by that kit. Otherwise means having the car towed home.
Towed ... on a dolly I assume? ;-)
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Other thing I've been told is that if you use that gunk, a simple puncture
can't be properly repaired. But dunno for sure.
I'm not sure about 'that gunk' either, and why I wouldn't bother with
it.
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
I've got the same problem here.
With tyres that price even an extra tenner per corner (assuming they
are biggish) for protection against the most basic of puncture might
be worth the peace of mind (let alone the cost of damaging a tyre
because you ran it soft)?
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
But my car has little room for a spare, so
perhaps more justified.
I guess it's one of those things you / some need to experience before
they 'get it'. I have used it (Punctureseal) enough to know how / that
does work and only when it should.

e.g. Daughter clipped a sharp sticking-out paving stone whilst
avoiding someone who should have given way and it bit a 5p sized hole
out of the sidewall of her nearly new van tyre (isn't it always the
way). ;-(

The Punctureseal didn't try to fix that because none of it was inside
the sidewall. However, we were able to recover the Punctureseal from
the nearly new tyre and put it in the spare (and washed the remains
out of the damaged tyre to show that we could). ;-)

Apart from protecting from punctures by instantly fixing the leak it's
also supposed to reduce the risk of damage by allowing the object to
be ejected sooner (or at all) because of the sealant going out past
the object, lubricating it and allowing it to be thrown out due to
centripetal force.

Cheers, T i m
dennis@home
2017-12-30 23:34:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
Apart from protecting from punctures by instantly fixing the leak it's
also supposed to reduce the risk of damage by allowing the object to
be ejected sooner (or at all) because of the sealant going out past
the object, lubricating it and allowing it to be thrown out due to
centripetal force.
Cheers, T i m
How often do you check the tyres to see if the punctureseal has sealed a
hole?
Its not an approved method of repair AFAIK so it makes it illegal to
drive on the tyre or at least not for long.

I feel that doing a visual inspection of all of each tyre daily is a bit
of a problem especially when dirt might hide the gunk.
T i m
2017-12-31 00:06:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
Apart from protecting from punctures by instantly fixing the leak it's
also supposed to reduce the risk of damage by allowing the object to
be ejected sooner (or at all) because of the sealant going out past
the object, lubricating it and allowing it to be thrown out due to
centripetal force.
Cheers, T i m
How often do you check the tyres to see if the punctureseal has sealed a
hole?
Only if I have the wheel off for some other reason?
Post by ***@home
Its not an approved method of repair AFAIK so it makes it illegal to
drive on the tyre or at least not for long.
Can you cite any proof of that assertion?

Are you suggesting that Continental tyres with the ContiSeal
technology are illegal for use in this country?
Post by ***@home
I feel that doing a visual inspection of all of each tyre daily is a bit
of a problem especially when dirt might hide the gunk.
Quite.

OOI, do you do a daily inspection of your tyres to see if they have
picked up something that might cause a puncture, or have already
punctured your tyres?

Or, assuming you don't have tyre pressure sensors, could you drive
some distance at some speed with a slowly deflating tyre and hope that
you 'notice' the tyre is soft before it explodes?

When you get a puncture repaired traditionally (plug / mushroom), how
much of the fabric (plys etc) of the tyre is inspected (within the
hole) to ensure no damage has been done?

Cheers, T i m
dennis@home
2017-12-31 11:54:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
Apart from protecting from punctures by instantly fixing the leak it's
also supposed to reduce the risk of damage by allowing the object to
be ejected sooner (or at all) because of the sealant going out past
the object, lubricating it and allowing it to be thrown out due to
centripetal force.
Cheers, T i m
How often do you check the tyres to see if the punctureseal has sealed a
hole?
Only if I have the wheel off for some other reason?
Post by ***@home
Its not an approved method of repair AFAIK so it makes it illegal to
drive on the tyre or at least not for long.
Can you cite any proof of that assertion?
Are you suggesting that Continental tyres with the ContiSeal
technology are illegal for use in this country?
Post by ***@home
I feel that doing a visual inspection of all of each tyre daily is a bit
of a problem especially when dirt might hide the gunk.
Quite.
OOI, do you do a daily inspection of your tyres to see if they have
picked up something that might cause a puncture, or have already
punctured your tyres?
Or, assuming you don't have tyre pressure sensors, could you drive
some distance at some speed with a slowly deflating tyre and hope that
you 'notice' the tyre is soft before it explodes?
I have sensors.
they are now compulsory on new cars, the EU saw to that.
Another reason to stay/comply with the regs.
Post by T i m
When you get a puncture repaired traditionally (plug / mushroom), how
much of the fabric (plys etc) of the tyre is inspected (within the
hole) to ensure no damage has been done?
Modern tyres don't need much inspection, long gone are the days where
any damage to the cords required a new tyre.
(And to the days of tyre repair operators prodding at the hole with a
screwdriver until they broke the cords and you needed a new tyre.)

Damage to the side wall is non repairable as is anything close to the
edge of the tread as they flex too much and there is no reliable repair
not even punctureseal.


This link gives an idea of what can be repaired..

https://www.blackcircles.com/general/repair

As you can see any repair outside the area is not legal so if you get a
puncture outside the area that puncturseal "fixes" you still can't drive
on it without it failing a roadside or MOT check.
So you need to check frequently to know you aren't breaking the law as
you have no other way of knowing if it doesn't leak.
T i m
2017-12-31 12:24:06 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 31 Dec 2017 11:54:52 +0000, "***@home"
<***@nowhere.invalid> wrote:

<snip>
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
Or, assuming you don't have tyre pressure sensors, could you drive
some distance at some speed with a slowly deflating tyre and hope that
you 'notice' the tyre is soft before it explodes?
I have sensors.
Ok.
Post by ***@home
they are now compulsory on new cars, the EU saw to that.
What's that, the EU did something good! <shrug>
Post by ***@home
Another reason to stay/comply with the regs.
Ok.
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
When you get a puncture repaired traditionally (plug / mushroom), how
much of the fabric (plys etc) of the tyre is inspected (within the
hole) to ensure no damage has been done?
Modern tyres don't need much inspection, long gone are the days where
any damage to the cords required a new tyre.
Ok.
Post by ***@home
(And to the days of tyre repair operators prodding at the hole with a
screwdriver until they broke the cords and you needed a new tyre.)
Ok.
Post by ***@home
Damage to the side wall is non repairable
Correct.
Post by ***@home
as is anything close to the
edge of the tread as they flex too much and there is no reliable repair
not even punctureseal.
Are you sure about that? The thing is, if you try to plug a hole with
a chunk of rubber, even if 'vulcanised' to the inside, then it is
still a physical object stuck in the hole (especially if they drill /
file the hole bigger to fir a plug etc). Punctureseal, being a fibrous
gel is stuck into the insides of the hole and retains the same levels
of flexibility of the tyre itself.
Post by ***@home
This link gives an idea of what can be repaired..
https://www.blackcircles.com/general/repair
Yes, I know, but we aren't talking about dealing with a puncture in
the workshop, we are talking about using science and technology to not
have to in most cases. Let's face it, you could get a hole in a tyre
and not damage a tube and nothing bad would happen. As you have said
yourself, as long as the integrity of the carcase is still intact, the
only thing you need to do then is seal the insides of the hole to
prevent water / dirt penetration and stop the air getting out.
Post by ***@home
As you can see any repair outside the area is not legal so if you get a
puncture outside the area that puncturseal "fixes" you still can't drive
on it without it failing a roadside or MOT check.
It would be interesting to see what the MOT boys here think of that.
Post by ***@home
So you need to check frequently to know you aren't breaking the law as
you have no other way of knowing if it doesn't leak.
Given the choice of breaking any 'law' versus putting me or my family
at risk from changing a wheel in a dangerous situation or not noticing
a slow puncture before it became worse, I know what I would rather
choose (and have chosen). ;-)

I repeat, can you please cite me the regulations that condemn the use
of such a sealant in the UK?

https://www.blackcircles.com/tyres/brands/continental/premium-contact-2-contiseal

Cheers, T i m
dennis@home
2017-12-31 12:40:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
I repeat, can you please cite me the regulations that condemn the use
of such a sealant in the UK?
https://www.blackcircles.com/tyres/brands/continental/premium-contact-2-contiseal
Cheers, T i m
Quote

Not designed to be driven when flat, under inflated or as a permanent
puncture repair.
T i m
2017-12-31 14:22:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
I repeat, can you please cite me the regulations that condemn the use
of such a sealant in the UK?
https://www.blackcircles.com/tyres/brands/continental/premium-contact-2-contiseal
Cheers, T i m
Quote
Not designed to be driven when flat,
No!?!
Post by ***@home
under inflated
No!?!
Post by ***@home
or as a permanent
puncture repair.
"The Continental Premium Contact 2 ContiSeal is a run flat tyre,
designed for fitment on luxury and mid sized vehicles.@

Go figure ...

And as you say, how do you determine that (that you have had a
puncture ... and it's just them protecting their backs IMHO).

Or maybe whatever Continental use isn't as good as Punctureseal?

But let's see what they say:

https://blobs.continental-tires.com/www8/servlet/blob/15362/c2068e0f9004bba362a4ac6fabfcadd8/contiseal-download-1-data.pdf

"Upon discovering a puncture, a tyre specialist must promptly check
the tyre."

You can see it now ... you walk into any tyre fitters and say "Could
you check and see if any of my tyres have punctures please?" If they
actually walk out and maybe feel round your tyres, and find nothing
... what next, take them all off and put them in their water tank?

Do you do the same the next day?

It is your responsibility (as the driver) to ensure all your road
wheels and tyres are roadworthy at all times, including presumably,
any damage done to any tyre, irrespective if it has a puncture or not?

It is my suggestion that 'prevention is better than cure' and a tyre
with a slow puncture is potentially more dangerous than one with a
more obvious one (inside of a blowout etc).

Still waiting for the law on the subject, confirming your assertion
that the use of a sealant was / could be 'illegal'?

"Its not an approved method of repair AFAIK so it makes it illegal to
drive on the tyre or at least not for long."

Maybe you (like many others) confabulate a 'Get you home' solution
with a pre-emptive / permanent one?

Cheers, T i m
dennis@home
2017-12-31 15:25:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
I repeat, can you please cite me the regulations that condemn the use
of such a sealant in the UK?
https://www.blackcircles.com/tyres/brands/continental/premium-contact-2-contiseal
Cheers, T i m
Quote
Not designed to be driven when flat,
No!?!
Post by ***@home
under inflated
No!?!
Post by ***@home
or as a permanent
puncture repair.
"The Continental Premium Contact 2 ContiSeal is a run flat tyre,
Go figure ...
And as you say, how do you determine that (that you have had a
puncture ... and it's just them protecting their backs IMHO).
Or maybe whatever Continental use isn't as good as Punctureseal?
https://blobs.continental-tires.com/www8/servlet/blob/15362/c2068e0f9004bba362a4ac6fabfcadd8/contiseal-download-1-data.pdf
"Upon discovering a puncture, a tyre specialist must promptly check
the tyre."
You can see it now ... you walk into any tyre fitters and say "Could
you check and see if any of my tyres have punctures please?" If they
actually walk out and maybe feel round your tyres, and find nothing
... what next, take them all off and put them in their water tank?
Do you do the same the next day?
It is your responsibility (as the driver) to ensure all your road
wheels and tyres are roadworthy at all times, including presumably,
any damage done to any tyre, irrespective if it has a puncture or not?
It is my suggestion that 'prevention is better than cure' and a tyre
with a slow puncture is potentially more dangerous than one with a
more obvious one (inside of a blowout etc).
Still waiting for the law on the subject, confirming your assertion
that the use of a sealant was / could be 'illegal'?
"Its not an approved method of repair AFAIK so it makes it illegal to
drive on the tyre or at least not for long."
Maybe you (like many others) confabulate a 'Get you home' solution
with a pre-emptive / permanent one?
Cheers, T i m
You still need frequent inspections as you have no other mechanism to
check and to quote from the manufacturer..

"Punctureseal s warranty is for the tread area of the tyre only. The
tread area has sufficient rubber and ply’s for adequate flexing and
recovery. Sidewall construction is extremely thin, especially in radial
tyres. Punctureseal is capable of providing minor repairs to the
sidewall/crown areas. But due to vast variance in tyre manufacturing and
subsequent wounds that may severely damage the tyres structural
integrity, Punctureseal does not consider sidewall/crown repairs as
positive repairs."

So the manufacturer only thinks its OK for about 75% of the tread width.
I expect its also illegal on any car with TPM as it is likely to stop it
working as it seals the valve cores. I don't see any reference to TPMs
in the guide.
T i m
2017-12-31 16:42:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 31 Dec 2017 15:25:41 +0000, "***@home"
<***@nowhere.invalid> wrote:

<snip>
Post by ***@home
You still need frequent inspections as you have no other mechanism to
check
Yes, like I said, it's the drivers responsibility ...
Post by ***@home
and to quote from the manufacturer..
"Punctureseal s warranty is for the tread area of the tyre only.
Of course?
Post by ***@home
The
tread area has sufficient rubber and ply’s for adequate flexing and
recovery.
Yup.
Post by ***@home
Sidewall construction is extremely thin, especially in radial
tyres. Punctureseal is capable of providing minor repairs to the
sidewall/crown areas. But due to vast variance in tyre manufacturing and
subsequent wounds that may severely damage the tyres structural
integrity, Punctureseal does not consider sidewall/crown repairs as
positive repairs."
And hence why it doesn't generally work with such punctures? I can't
'fix' the tyre, it can only stop it leaking air whilst preventing
contamination of the inside of the hole, like most other repair
solutions?
Post by ***@home
So the manufacturer only thinks its OK for about 75% of the tread width.
That's right?
Post by ***@home
I expect its also illegal on any car with TPM as it is likely to stop it
working as it seals the valve cores.
Does it now? Where does it say it 'seals the valve cores' and why
would it? If you understood where the TPM's were located and how they
worked you would see that was highly unlikely.

... or are you just looking for another strawman? ;-)
Post by ***@home
I don't see any reference to TPMs
in the guide.
Howabout in here, a test conducted at the Millbrook Testing Ground
using "Stack TPMS Sensors" ... ?

http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf

I've also asked them by email previously (for someone else) and they
say they have had no issues using Punctureseal with TPMs.

Cheers, T i m
dennis@home
2017-12-31 17:58:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
<snip>
Post by ***@home
You still need frequent inspections as you have no other mechanism to
check
Yes, like I said, it's the drivers responsibility ...
Post by ***@home
and to quote from the manufacturer..
"Punctureseal s warranty is for the tread area of the tyre only.
Of course?
Post by ***@home
The
tread area has sufficient rubber and ply’s for adequate flexing and
recovery.
Yup.
Post by ***@home
Sidewall construction is extremely thin, especially in radial
tyres. Punctureseal is capable of providing minor repairs to the
sidewall/crown areas. But due to vast variance in tyre manufacturing and
subsequent wounds that may severely damage the tyres structural
integrity, Punctureseal does not consider sidewall/crown repairs as
positive repairs."
And hence why it doesn't generally work with such punctures? I can't
'fix' the tyre, it can only stop it leaking air whilst preventing
contamination of the inside of the hole, like most other repair
solutions?
Post by ***@home
So the manufacturer only thinks its OK for about 75% of the tread width.
That's right?
Post by ***@home
I expect its also illegal on any car with TPM as it is likely to stop it
working as it seals the valve cores.
Does it now? Where does it say it 'seals the valve cores' and why
would it? If you understood where the TPM's were located and how they
worked you would see that was highly unlikely.
From the manufacturer..
"Once a tyre has been treated with Punctureseal, frequent air pressure
checks will not be necessary, although visual tyre inspections are still
very important. Air pressure checks can be accomplished during the
routine vehicle Preventative Maintenance (PM) schedules. In order to
check air pressure, remember that Punctureseal is standing on guard to
prevent air loss. If you check air pressure without first blowing a
slight amount of air into the valve, Punctureseal will most likely seal
off the valve core. It is important to clear the valve core and stem of
any Punctureseal prior to checking air pressure. This is accomplished
by simply blowing a small amount of air through the valve and into the
tyre, this will clear the passage and allow for proper air pressure
reading. Puctureseal will not ruin the valve core. If the core gets
clogged, remove and rinse with water and reinstall (see installation tips)."
Post by T i m
... or are you just looking for another strawman? ;-)
I just read the technical guide and it doesn't look very good IMO.
(Unless you are driving a military vehicle and you want to plug bullet
holes for a few hours.)
Post by T i m
Post by ***@home
I don't see any reference to TPMs
in the guide.
Howabout in here, a test conducted at the Millbrook Testing Ground
using "Stack TPMS Sensors" ... ?
http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf
And where did they actually check the TPMs was actually working?
They just used it instead of putting a stick guage on the valve AFAICS.
Post by T i m
I've also asked them by email previously (for someone else) and they
say they have had no issues using Punctureseal with TPMs.
Well them not having a problem with TPMs isn't the same as TPMs having a
problem with punctureseal.

Now if you have any TPMs manufacturer saying that its not going to be a
problem that would be different.
Post by T i m
Cheers, T i m
T i m
2018-01-01 00:24:23 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 31 Dec 2017 17:58:10 +0000, "***@home"
<***@nowhere.invalid> wrote:

<snip>
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
Post by ***@home
I expect its also illegal on any car with TPM as it is likely to stop it
working as it seals the valve cores.
Does it now? Where does it say it 'seals the valve cores' and why
would it? If you understood where the TPM's were located and how they
worked you would see that was highly unlikely.
From the manufacturer..
"Once a tyre has been treated with Punctureseal, frequent air pressure
checks will not be necessary, although visual tyre inspections are still
very important. Air pressure checks can be accomplished during the
routine vehicle Preventative Maintenance (PM) schedules. In order to
check air pressure, remember that Punctureseal is standing on guard to
prevent air loss. If you check air pressure without first blowing a
slight amount of air into the valve, Punctureseal will most likely seal
off the valve core.
Hmm. 1) I can't see how it would, given there would not be any
anywhere near the back of the valve, given that it has all been thrown
to the outside of the tyre and 2) it has never been an issue for me in
all the years I've been using it.

I wonder if that warning only relates to a fresh installation or where
the installer has do so using their pressure insertion tool (where the
Punctureseal is installed with the tyre at full pressure)?
Post by ***@home
any Punctureseal prior to checking air pressure. This is accomplished
by simply blowing a small amount of air through the valve and into the
tyre, this will clear the passage and allow for proper air pressure
reading.
Never to go near the back of the valve (in the rim, not the tyre)
again?
Post by ***@home
Puctureseal will not ruin the valve core. If the core gets
clogged, remove and rinse with water and reinstall (see installation tips)."
Bizarre. I'll have to drop them a line.
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
... or are you just looking for another strawman? ;-)
I just read the technical guide and it doesn't look very good IMO.
Because?
Post by ***@home
(Unless you are driving a military vehicle and you want to plug bullet
holes for a few hours.)
;-)
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
Post by ***@home
I don't see any reference to TPMs
in the guide.
Howabout in here, a test conducted at the Millbrook Testing Ground
using "Stack TPMS Sensors" ... ?
http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf
And where did they actually check the TPMs was actually working?
All the time presumably?
Post by ***@home
They just used it instead of putting a stick guage on the valve AFAICS.
<shrug>
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
I've also asked them by email previously (for someone else) and they
say they have had no issues using Punctureseal with TPMs.
Well them not having a problem with TPMs isn't the same as TPMs having a
problem with punctureseal.
Only by your bizarre interpretation.
Post by ***@home
Now if you have any TPMs manufacturer saying that its not going to be a
problem that would be different.
See, if you understood how the sealant worked you might then
understand how it's unlikely to be an issue with such things.

How I install it.

Jack up a wheel, remove the valve core and position the valve near the
bottom. Inject the right quantity of sealant that flows out of the
back of the valve and straight into the tyre. I run some kitchen towel
though the valve stem to remove any sealant, re fit the valve core and
re inflate. At this point the sealant is only in a pool in the tyre
and at the bottom. I repeat with the other 3 wheels.

Once complete I drive away and nearly instantly the sealant is
dispersed around the inside of the tyre. You are supposed to give it a
run of about 20 mins so we would normally do such just before going
somewhere at least 20 mins away.

The sealant then stays just inside the tyre, never going anywhere near
the valve or rim. I have taken several treated tyres off the rims once
they were worn out and there was no trace of sealant anywhere else
other than inside the main tread area of the tyre. <shrug>

Look at the picture of the ConiSeal tyre, how could that get anywhere
near the valve or TPMS?

You are still looking for strawmen, I'm telling you how it works ITRW.

But hey, you are welcome not to use it ... I'll wave as I drive past
(maybe I won't if you are upside down with a windscreen wiper going
through your head). ;-(

Cheers, T i m
Rod Speed
2017-12-31 18:52:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
Post by ***@home
Post by T i m
Apart from protecting from punctures by instantly fixing the leak it's
also supposed to reduce the risk of damage by allowing the object to
be ejected sooner (or at all) because of the sealant going out past
the object, lubricating it and allowing it to be thrown out due to
centripetal force.
Cheers, T i m
How often do you check the tyres to see if the punctureseal has sealed a
hole?
Only if I have the wheel off for some other reason?
Post by ***@home
Its not an approved method of repair AFAIK so it makes it illegal to
drive on the tyre or at least not for long.
Can you cite any proof of that assertion?
Are you suggesting that Continental tyres with the ContiSeal
technology are illegal for use in this country?
Post by ***@home
I feel that doing a visual inspection of all of each tyre daily is a bit
of a problem especially when dirt might hide the gunk.
Quite.
OOI, do you do a daily inspection of your tyres to see if they have
picked up something that might cause a puncture, or have already
punctured your tyres?
Or, assuming you don't have tyre pressure sensors, could you drive
some distance at some speed with a slowly deflating tyre and hope that
you 'notice' the tyre is soft before it explodes?
I have sensors.
they are now compulsory on new cars, the EU saw to that.
Another reason to stay/comply with the regs.
Post by T i m
When you get a puncture repaired traditionally (plug / mushroom), how
much of the fabric (plys etc) of the tyre is inspected (within the
hole) to ensure no damage has been done?
Modern tyres don't need much inspection, long gone are the days where any
damage to the cords required a new tyre.
(And to the days of tyre repair operators prodding at the hole with a
screwdriver until they broke the cords and you needed a new tyre.)
Damage to the side wall is non repairable as is anything close to the edge
of the tread as they flex too much and there is no reliable repair not
even punctureseal.
This link gives an idea of what can be repaired..
https://www.blackcircles.com/general/repair
As you can see any repair outside the area is not legal so if you get a
puncture outside the area that puncturseal "fixes" you still can't drive
on it without it failing a roadside or MOT check.
So you need to check frequently to know you aren't breaking the law
Nope, because that type of damage is so uncommon now.
Post by ***@home
as you have no other way of knowing if it doesn't leak.
Jethro_uk
2018-01-02 11:50:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Yes. Even if you can't change a wheel yourself, the AA etc can. If the
tyre can't be fixed by that kit. Otherwise means having the car towed home.
Do they charge, if the car didn't have a spare ?

Last time I saw the T&Cs they were very clear that the customer had to
pay for any towing caused by (a) failure to carry a serviceable spare
wheel; or (b) running out of fuel.
Andy Burns
2018-01-02 11:58:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Yes. Even if you can't change a wheel yourself, the AA etc can. If the
tyre can't be fixed by that kit. Otherwise means having the car towed home.
Do they charge, if the car didn't have a spare ?
Last time I saw the T&Cs they were very clear that the customer had to
pay for any towing caused by (a) failure to carry a serviceable spare
wheel; or (b) running out of fuel.
When my tyre shredded itself on the M1, Honda arranged the recovery Foc
(included in their warranty, provided you had it serviced at main dealer
IIRC)

I probably had the choice of being recovered back to home, but chose to
have it taken to the nearest tyre merchant that had a replacement in stock.
Jethro_uk
2018-01-02 13:21:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Yes. Even if you can't change a wheel yourself, the AA etc can. If the
tyre can't be fixed by that kit. Otherwise means having the car towed home.
Do they charge, if the car didn't have a spare ?
Last time I saw the T&Cs they were very clear that the customer had to
pay for any towing caused by (a) failure to carry a serviceable spare
wheel; or (b) running out of fuel.
When my tyre shredded itself on the M1, Honda arranged the recovery Foc
(included in their warranty, provided you had it serviced at main dealer
IIRC)
I probably had the choice of being recovered back to home, but chose to
have it taken to the nearest tyre merchant that had a replacement in stock.
When I worked in the motor trade, I was amazed at the number of customers
who managed to get their car recovered back to their house rather than
straight to us. This was long after the AA started relay, where they'd
get you to your destination, and your car to the garage of your choice.
The Natural Philosopher
2018-01-02 13:29:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
When I worked in the motor trade, I was amazed at the number of customers
who managed to get their car recovered back to their house rather than
straight to us.
Bless!

That way they are not at your mercy on costs.
Post by Jethro_uk
This was long after the AA started relay, where they'd
get you to your destination, and your car to the garage of your choice.
Yebbut you need to decide which is the garage of choice before you get
the car there.
--
New Socialism consists essentially in being seen to have your heart in
the right place whilst your head is in the clouds and your hand is in
someone else's pocket.
Jethro_uk
2018-01-02 14:48:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Jethro_uk
When I worked in the motor trade, I was amazed at the number of
customers who managed to get their car recovered back to their house
rather than straight to us.
Bless!
That way they are not at your mercy on costs.
Fair point. But almost all our customers were long-term regulars. We
weren't a "fix-em-all" outfit. So any putative choice they were
engineering was wiped out by us having to re-recover the car to the
workshop.
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Jethro_uk
This was long after the AA started relay, where they'd get you to your
destination, and your car to the garage of your choice.
Yebbut you need to decide which is the garage of choice before you get
the car there.
As I said, we were their "regular" garage.

The bottom line is, generally, customers are none too bright.
The Natural Philosopher
2018-01-02 15:00:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
The bottom line is, generally, customers are none too bright.
And garages are none too honest
--
No Apple devices were knowingly used in the preparation of this post.
Jethro_uk
2018-01-02 15:30:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Jethro_uk
The bottom line is, generally, customers are none too bright.
And garages are none too honest
*Shrug*

30 years in business with a total advertising budget of £0. Total word of
mouth.

I've *fixed* dishonest mistakes ... like the cylinder head gasket put on
upside down which blocked the oil channel and wore the cam carrier to
paper.
Brian Reay
2018-01-02 15:49:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Jethro_uk
The bottom line is, generally, customers are none too bright.
And garages are none too honest
*Shrug*
30 years in business with a total advertising budget of £0. Total word of
mouth.
I've *fixed* dishonest mistakes ... like the cylinder head gasket put on
upside down which blocked the oil channel and wore the cam carrier to
paper.
There are good garages around, I've found a couple- which I use for jobs
I no longer want to/feel able to tackle.

I'm wary of main dealers- I prefer to use a small garage. The two
garages I prefer to use I've got the know the people over the years- one
was a neighbour. I've never had a bad experience or heard of anyone
having one at either place.
charles
2018-01-02 16:22:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Reay
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Jethro_uk
The bottom line is, generally, customers are none too bright.
And garages are none too honest
*Shrug*
30 years in business with a total advertising budget of £0. Total word of
mouth.
I've *fixed* dishonest mistakes ... like the cylinder head gasket put on
upside down which blocked the oil channel and wore the cam carrier to
paper.
There are good garages around, I've found a couple- which I use for jobs
I no longer want to/feel able to tackle.
I'm wary of main dealers- I prefer to use a small garage. The two
garages I prefer to use I've got the know the people over the years- one
was a neighbour. I've never had a bad experience or heard of anyone
having one at either place.
In the 60s. I did my own maaintenance, but I chickened out of the universal
joints on the prop shaft. I asked at one local garage and was told - "we
can't do that we don't have the right tools." Other might have just bodged
it.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
The Natural Philosopher
2018-01-02 16:44:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Brian Reay
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Jethro_uk
The bottom line is, generally, customers are none too bright.
And garages are none too honest
*Shrug*
30 years in business with a total advertising budget of £0. Total word of
mouth.
I've *fixed* dishonest mistakes ... like the cylinder head gasket put on
upside down which blocked the oil channel and wore the cam carrier to
paper.
There are good garages around, I've found a couple- which I use for jobs
I no longer want to/feel able to tackle.
I'm wary of main dealers- I prefer to use a small garage. The two
garages I prefer to use I've got the know the people over the years- one
was a neighbour. I've never had a bad experience or heard of anyone
having one at either place.
In the 60s. I did my own maaintenance, but I chickened out of the universal
joints on the prop shaft. I asked at one local garage and was told - "we
can't do that we don't have the right tools." Other might have just bodged
it.
extraoprdinary. we used to do those with a pair of sockets and a bench vice
--
"When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign,
that the dunces are all in confederacy against him."

Jonathan Swift.
charles
2018-01-02 20:43:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by charles
Post by Brian Reay
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Jethro_uk
The bottom line is, generally, customers are none too bright.
And garages are none too honest
*Shrug*
30 years in business with a total advertising budget of £0. Total
word of mouth.
I've *fixed* dishonest mistakes ... like the cylinder head gasket put
on upside down which blocked the oil channel and wore the cam carrier
to paper.
There are good garages around, I've found a couple- which I use for
jobs I no longer want to/feel able to tackle.
I'm wary of main dealers- I prefer to use a small garage. The two
garages I prefer to use I've got the know the people over the years-
one was a neighbour. I've never had a bad experience or heard of
anyone having one at either place.
In the 60s. I did my own maaintenance, but I chickened out of the
universal joints on the prop shaft. I asked at one local garage and was
told - "we can't do that we don't have the right tools." Other might
have just bodged it.
extraoprdinary. we used to do those with a pair of sockets and a bench vice
You're right - it wasn't the UJs, I did do those myslef., It was something
more complex to do with the diff. Perhaps replacing the halfshaft oil seals
It certainly needed specialised tools.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
T i m
2018-01-02 22:56:33 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 02 Jan 2018 20:43:28 +0000 (GMT), charles
<***@candehope.me.uk> wrote:

<snip>
Post by charles
You're right - it wasn't the UJs, I did do those myslef.
So did I, when I shortened the prop shaft 10" when we built the
kitcar. I only did it by hand the best I could and really only to get
it though the first MOT but it ended up staying on there around 5000
miles. ;-)
Post by charles
It was something
more complex to do with the diff.
Shimming?
Post by charles
Perhaps replacing the halfshaft oil seals
It certainly needed specialised tools.
I'm not sure if the halfshaft seals would need a particularly
specialised tool (mine didn't) but when I changed the input flange I
had to (as supposed to) use a 'crushable spacer' that you tighten the
flange nut down onto to give the right backlash (or some other
clearance).

My mate has run his own garage for 35 years or more and as others have
mentioned, he too has built up a good collection of Frankenstein tools
to deal with special occasions (before / if they weren't available
commercially).

He often quizzes me as to what I think they are for and I sometimes
get it right. ;-)

Cheers, T i m
charles
2018-01-03 09:04:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
On Tue, 02 Jan 2018 20:43:28 +0000 (GMT), charles
<snip>
Post by charles
You're right - it wasn't the UJs, I did do those myslef.
So did I, when I shortened the prop shaft 10" when we built the
kitcar. I only did it by hand the best I could and really only to get
it though the first MOT but it ended up staying on there around 5000
miles. ;-)
Post by charles
It was something
more complex to do with the diff.
Shimming?
Post by charles
Perhaps replacing the halfshaft oil seals
It certainly needed specialised tools.
I'm not sure if the halfshaft seals would need a particularly
specialised tool (mine didn't) but when I changed the input flange I
had to (as supposed to) use a 'crushable spacer' that you tighten the
flange nut down onto to give the right backlash (or some other
clearance).
My mate has run his own garage for 35 years or more and as others have
mentioned, he too has built up a good collection of Frankenstein tools
to deal with special occasions (before / if they weren't available
commercially).
I sold the aforementioned car in 1984 - That's about the time your mate
started his business. Perhapsm he bought mine to experiment on ;-)
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
Jethro_uk
2018-01-02 16:57:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
In the 60s. I did my own maaintenance, but I chickened out of the
universal joints on the prop shaft. I asked at one local garage and was
told - "we can't do that we don't have the right tools."
My Dad was anal about having the right tool for the job. Even if it cost
a fortune.

We were the only garage that had a lathe, a 3-tonne hydraulic press, a
body jack (which was £300 in 1981) plus specialist spanners, drivers,
reamers and goodness knows what.

Other garages would bring jobs to us ...

I also watched my Dad make the right tool, if needs be. Some of which are
still perfectly serviceable decades on. Custom cranked sockets for
reaching that "special" nut for example.
Rod Speed
2018-01-02 17:16:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Brian Reay
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by Jethro_uk
The bottom line is, generally, customers are none too bright.
And garages are none too honest
*Shrug*
30 years in business with a total advertising budget of £0. Total word of
mouth.
I've *fixed* dishonest mistakes ... like the cylinder head gasket put on
upside down which blocked the oil channel and wore the cam carrier to
paper.
There are good garages around, I've found a couple- which I use for jobs
I no longer want to/feel able to tackle.
I'm wary of main dealers- I prefer to use a small garage. The two
garages I prefer to use I've got the know the people over the years- one
was a neighbour. I've never had a bad experience or heard of anyone
having one at either place.
In the 60s. I did my own maaintenance, but I chickened out of the universal
joints on the prop shaft. I asked at one local garage and was told - "we
can't do that we don't have the right tools." Other might have just bodged
it.
Yeah, when I had to replace a front wheel bearing in a VW beetle,
the book said to use a special tool. So I asked the local VW dealer
for a lend of one after I got the replacement bearing from them.
He told me they just bash it off. Worked quite adequately.
Dave Plowman (News)
2018-01-03 11:09:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
When I worked in the motor trade, I was amazed at the number of customers
who managed to get their car recovered back to their house rather than
straight to us. This was long after the AA started relay, where they'd
get you to your destination, and your car to the garage of your choice.
Last time I used them, they insisted on taking the car to a local garage.
Water pump had disintegrated, and the chances of that garage having one in
stock remote. And of course they didn't. So had to wait for a second
recovery vehicle to take us and car home. Because of this delay, to late
to get the car to my local garage of choice.
--
*I'm planning to be spontaneous tomorrow *

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
Jethro_uk
2018-01-03 14:23:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Last time I used them, they insisted on taking the car to a local
garage. Water pump had disintegrated, and the chances of that garage
having one in stock remote. And of course they didn't.
Who carries stock these days ? Almost all non-consumables seem to need
ordering. Sometimes within the day (even 20 years ago, in London there
were auto factors that could deliver an order before midday in the PM).

The enormous price savings from a few hours delay make JIT a modern
miracle. We'll miss it when it's gone.
Huge
2018-01-03 16:40:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Last time I used them, they insisted on taking the car to a local
garage. Water pump had disintegrated, and the chances of that garage
having one in stock remote. And of course they didn't.
Who carries stock these days ? Almost all non-consumables seem to need
ordering. Sometimes within the day (even 20 years ago, in London there
were auto factors that could deliver an order before midday in the PM).
The enormous price savings from a few hours delay make JIT a modern
miracle. We'll miss it when it's gone.
Starting Friday 29 March, 2019. I wouldn't try and use any of the Channel
Crossings, either.
--
Today is Pungenday, the 3rd day of Chaos in the YOLD 3184
Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
Jethro_uk
2018-01-03 17:03:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Huge
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Last time I used them, they insisted on taking the car to a local
garage. Water pump had disintegrated, and the chances of that garage
having one in stock remote. And of course they didn't.
Who carries stock these days ? Almost all non-consumables seem to need
ordering. Sometimes within the day (even 20 years ago, in London there
were auto factors that could deliver an order before midday in the PM).
The enormous price savings from a few hours delay make JIT a modern
miracle. We'll miss it when it's gone.
Starting Friday 29 March, 2019. I wouldn't try and use any of the
Channel Crossings, either.
I think it'll be before then. No one is going to risk £££s off stock
being caught in limbo, beyond the reach of insurance (oh, yes - that's
already started).
Dave Plowman (News)
2018-01-04 11:28:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Last time I used them, they insisted on taking the car to a local
garage. Water pump had disintegrated, and the chances of that garage
having one in stock remote. And of course they didn't.
Who carries stock these days ?
A main dealer with a spares department?
Post by Jethro_uk
Almost all non-consumables seem to need
ordering. Sometimes within the day (even 20 years ago, in London there
were auto factors that could deliver an order before midday in the PM).
The enormous price savings from a few hours delay make JIT a modern
miracle. We'll miss it when it's gone.
--
*I have a degree in liberal arts -- do you want fries with that

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
Rod Speed
2018-01-02 16:48:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Yes. Even if you can't change a wheel yourself, the AA etc can. If the
tyre can't be fixed by that kit. Otherwise means having the car towed home.
Do they charge, if the car didn't have a spare ?
Last time I saw the T&Cs they were very clear that the
customer had to pay for any towing caused by (a) failure
to carry a serviceable spare wheel; or (b) running out of fuel.
Why would it need to be towed if it ran out of fuel ?
F
2017-12-30 18:32:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Pick up a spare and a jack from the scrap yard, along with an extension
tube for the wheel brace. At least she'll have a chance of getting home
(with help if needed) with that compared with a shredded sidewall and a
bottle of useless sealant.
--
F
F
2017-12-30 18:36:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by F
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
  interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
  rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
  jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
  issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Pick up a spare and a jack from the scrap yard, along with an extension
tube for the wheel brace. At least she'll have a chance of getting home
(with help if needed) with that compared with a shredded sidewall and a
bottle of useless sealant.
Should have added that a subscription to AutoAid would be a good move too.
--
F
TheChief
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by F
Post by F
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Pick up a spare and a jack from the scrap yard, along with an extension
tube for the wheel brace. At least she'll have a chance of getting home
(with help if needed) with that compared with a shredded sidewall and a
bottle of useless sealant.
Should have added that a subscription to AutoAid would be a good move too.
--
F
Yes we both have breakdown assistance via insurance.

Can't help thinking that the number of call outs for their
services will have increased with the introduction of these cost
saving devices.
--
----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
dennis@home
2017-12-31 11:56:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Post by F
Post by F
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Pick up a spare and a jack from the scrap yard, along with an extension
tube for the wheel brace. At least she'll have a chance of getting home
(with help if needed) with that compared with a shredded sidewall and a
bottle of useless sealant.
Should have added that a subscription to AutoAid would be a good move too.
--
F
Yes we both have breakdown assistance via insurance.
Can't help thinking that the number of call outs for their
services will have increased with the introduction of these cost
saving devices.
It probably hasn't made any difference as most people can't change their
wheels anyway.
Roger Mills
2017-12-31 12:46:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@home
Can't help thinking that the number of call outs for their
services will have increased with the introduction of these cost
saving devices.
It probably hasn't made any difference as most people can't change their
wheels anyway.
Is it a generational thing? At 75, I can still swap all 4 wheels on a
Volvo V70 with my winter set in under an hour.
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.
T i m
2017-12-31 14:53:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Mills
Post by ***@home
Can't help thinking that the number of call outs for their
services will have increased with the introduction of these cost
saving devices.
It probably hasn't made any difference as most people can't change their
wheels anyway.
Is it a generational thing?
Maybe it is, unless unchecked?
Post by Roger Mills
At 75, I can still swap all 4 wheels on a
Volvo V70 with my winter set in under an hour.
And assuming you still have reasonable strength (plus the right tools,
like a spider or extending breaker bar), mobility and some common
sense / experience, there is no reason why you shouldn't.

One of the things I've done with most of my friends and family is to
oversee *them* changing a wheel, just in case. I'm hoping that even if
they change cars and we don't repeat the exercise, they still might be
confident enough to do it if push came to shove.

Same with our daughter and her installing Punctureseal in all her
vehicles. 1) They are hers and 2) she then knows how to do it safely
and 3) I'll not be here for ever. ;-)

With her Transit Connect, my *experience* of such things suggested we
should check that we / she can get the spare wheel out and we found we
could, but only just. The lowering mech was all jammed up and we had
to replace it. Then I made sure she fitted the spare wheel back, with
the tools I linked to on eBay because they were all missing.

I also got her to (grease then) use the supplied jack, rather than
getting my trolley jack because that would be all she had when out and
about. This also included tips for ensuring the jack was in the right
place, upright, extended close to the right height away from the
vehicle and only jacking the vehicle up enough to get the wheel clear.
To put the unused wheel under the right place on the vehicle to reduce
the risk should something slip or fail, how to align and lift / hold
with your knees, how to first run the nuts / studs up by hand and then
just nipping them up before lowering the vehicle onto the tyre
slightly to be able to tighten it a bit more (diagonally) before
lowering it fully to the ground for a final tighten.

We also printed the tyre pressures off with the Dymo label maker and
put them in the drivers door jam so you don't have to rummage though
the handbook to find the right pressures for the right tyre size /
average usage etc.

Luckily for her, all my 'precautions' and her willingness to be
involved paid off when she damaged the sidewall and the Punctureseal
wasn't able to help her. By the time I got to her she had the spare
wheel out and ready (but still under the van), the van jacked up and
she was just lifting the wheel off. She had managed to find a safe
place to limp into (as the tyre was already written off) so I just
oversaw her putting the spare on etc. She also helped when we removed
the damaged tyre, transferred the Punctureseal, fitted the spare, got
it balanced and put it back under the van. ;-)


Cheers, T i m
Rod Speed
2017-12-31 18:54:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@home
Post by TheChief
Post by F
Post by F
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Pick up a spare and a jack from the scrap yard, along with an extension
tube for the wheel brace. At least she'll have a chance of getting home
(with help if needed) with that compared with a shredded sidewall and a
bottle of useless sealant.
Should have added that a subscription to AutoAid would be a good move too.
--
F
Yes we both have breakdown assistance via insurance.
Can't help thinking that the number of call outs for their
services will have increased with the introduction of these cost
saving devices.
It probably hasn't made any difference as most people can't change their
wheels anyway.
Cite.
Andrew Gabriel
2017-12-30 22:05:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by F
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Pick up a spare and a jack from the scrap yard, along with an extension
tube for the wheel brace. At least she'll have a chance of getting home
(with help if needed) with that compared with a shredded sidewall and a
bottle of useless sealant.
Does the car have anywhere safe to store it, i.e. somewhere where
it's fixed, so it doesn't become a missile to kill you in a crash?
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
Dave Plowman (News)
2017-12-31 00:04:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by F
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Pick up a spare and a jack from the scrap yard, along with an extension
tube for the wheel brace. At least she'll have a chance of getting home
(with help if needed) with that compared with a shredded sidewall and a
bottle of useless sealant.
Undoing the bolts may or not be a problem - but you can always stand on
the brace if not strong enough. But getting a wheel off the centre can be
a right pain. As can fitting the spare. For someone not used to doing
this. And larger vehicles can have very heavy wheels.
--
*I couldn't repair your brakes, so I made your horn louder *

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
bert
2018-01-01 14:27:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Post by F
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Pick up a spare and a jack from the scrap yard, along with an extension
tube for the wheel brace. At least she'll have a chance of getting home
(with help if needed) with that compared with a shredded sidewall and a
bottle of useless sealant.
Undoing the bolts may or not be a problem - but you can always stand on
the brace if not strong enough.
Position the brace carefully and lift up the end with the jack thus
using the vehicle weight to turn the nut.
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
But getting a wheel off the centre can be
a right pain. As can fitting the spare. For someone not used to doing
this. And larger vehicles can have very heavy wheels.
--
bert
Jethro_uk
2018-01-02 11:57:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by bert
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Undoing the bolts may or not be a problem - but you can always stand on
the brace if not strong enough.
Position the brace carefully and lift up the end with the jack thus
using the vehicle weight to turn the nut.
When jacks were the old long "L" type, they had a hole in one end to slip
over the wheelbrace. (For some reason no one knew this)

Then scissor jacks came in. I have no idea how you were supposed to
loosen wheel nuts then.

I once managed to loosen the wheel nuts on a stranded Renault by placing
the brace against the kerb and getting the driver to move the car along
and use its weight.
Dave Plowman (News)
2018-01-03 11:04:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jethro_uk
Post by bert
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Undoing the bolts may or not be a problem - but you can always stand on
the brace if not strong enough.
Position the brace carefully and lift up the end with the jack thus
using the vehicle weight to turn the nut.
When jacks were the old long "L" type, they had a hole in one end to slip
over the wheelbrace. (For some reason no one knew this)
Then scissor jacks came in. I have no idea how you were supposed to
loosen wheel nuts then.
I once managed to loosen the wheel nuts on a stranded Renault by placing
the brace against the kerb and getting the driver to move the car along
and use its weight.
Lidl once in a while do a telescopic wheel brace. Collapsed, about the
same length as a normal one so may well fit the tool kit. And about twice
the leverage when fully extended. Very well made, too. Comes with the
standard 1/2" drive and with a reversible socket with the two common
sizes. Or can use your own socket.
--
*Never miss a good chance to shut up *

Dave Plowman ***@davenoise.co.uk London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
Jethro_uk
2018-01-03 11:18:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Lidl once in a while do a telescopic wheel brace.
Oh, "Maccess" used to sell them ... a couple of quid IIRC. We'd buy a
few, and flog them to people buying SH cars off us for £5.

One thing that has been progress in the past 30 years is the wide
availability of previously "trade only" or niche items.
T i m
2018-01-04 23:44:51 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 03 Jan 2018 11:04:12 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"
<***@davenoise.co.uk> wrote:

<snip>
Post by Dave Plowman (News)
Lidl once in a while do a telescopic wheel brace. Collapsed, about the
same length as a normal one so may well fit the tool kit. And about twice
the leverage when fully extended. Very well made, too. Comes with the
standard 1/2" drive and with a reversible socket with the two common
sizes. Or can use your own socket.
All of our vehicles have either one or those or a (folding) spider.

A lady neighbour asked me for help removing a wheel bolt from her car
and whist I knew her to be no shrinking violet, I wasn't how strong
she was so first just tried with the std brace that she had been using
(even with the supplied extension / handle). I couldn't budge it so
got my spider on it and again, nothing. Then I put a length of steel
tube on it (old motorcycle fork tube) and only as it was just about to
bend the spider did it come undone. Had it not let go at that point I
would have got her to 'shock' the nut / spider as I was putting the
torque on it.

The extending wheel brace 'might' have done it (without jumping or
driving on it etc).

Cheers, T i m
TheChief
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Thanks
Phil
----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Many thanks for all the useful comment guys.

One annoyance with all this is that the car has what looks like a
full depth spare wheel well.

So to save a few quid and perhaps some weight, the driver gets
stuck with a far interior solution to an age old
problem.

Phil
--
----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
T i m
2017-12-30 20:26:56 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 18:37:29 +0000 (GMT+00:00), TheChief
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

<snip>
Post by TheChief
One annoyance with all this is that the car has what looks like a
full depth spare wheel well.
So to save a few quid and perhaps some weight, the driver gets
stuck with a far interior solution to an age old
problem.
Except, you don't *have* to be stuck with it, there are modern
alternatives.

When we are motorcycle touring we can't easily carry spare tyres and
so we protect ourselves about the only way we feel appropriate by
making the tyres puncture proof, at least against the everyday
punctures.

The second line being AA Relay and / or the hope of getting a
replacement tyre for a supplier, wherever we happen to be.

It seems foolhardy to me to risk damaging a tyre or getting a blowout
because you inadvertently drive any distance, especially at speed
before realising you picked up a slow puncture a good few miles back.

Now, if you have tyre pressure monitors / warnings then at least you
should be protected from some of that but you still have to deal with
the puncture ... that you may well have never suffered from in the
first place with a little bit of preventative preparation.

'Of course', nothing is ever 100% but if it was only 50% that could
worth paying a few quid for?

Who goes on holiday without travel insurance or drives without some
sort of breakdown / recovery service ... or a credit card and a cell
phone at least?

All our cars, motorbikes, cycles and trailers are treated with
Punctureseal because a puncture in any of them at any time would
probably spoil our day. It would definitely spoil the Wife's day
because even though she built the kitcar with me, her various health
and mobility issues (even the arthritis in her hands / fingers) would
mean even changing a wheel a pretty difficult / dangerous experience
(even if she was able to find the telescopic brace and get the jack
out and in the right place).

Personally, I rather she didn't have to try ...

Cheers, T i m
TheChief
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 18:37:29 +0000 (GMT+00:00), TheChief
<snip>
Post by TheChief
One annoyance with all this is that the car has what looks like a
full depth spare wheel well.
So to save a few quid and perhaps some weight, the driver gets
stuck with a far interior solution to an age old
problem.
Except, you don't *have* to be stuck with it, there are modern
alternatives.
When we are motorcycle touring we can't easily carry spare tyres and
so we protect ourselves about the only way we feel appropriate by
making the tyres puncture proof, at least against the everyday
punctures.
The second line being AA Relay and / or the hope of getting a
replacement tyre for a supplier, wherever we happen to be.
It seems foolhardy to me to risk damaging a tyre or getting a blowout
because you inadvertently drive any distance, especially at speed
before realising you picked up a slow puncture a good few miles back.
Now, if you have tyre pressure monitors / warnings then at least you
should be protected from some of that but you still have to deal with
the puncture ... that you may well have never suffered from in the
first place with a little bit of preventative preparation.
'Of course', nothing is ever 100% but if it was only 50% that could
worth paying a few quid for?
Who goes on holiday without travel insurance or drives without some
sort of breakdown / recovery service ... or a credit card and a cell
phone at least?
All our cars, motorbikes, cycles and trailers are treated with
Punctureseal because a puncture in any of them at any time would
probably spoil our day. It would definitely spoil the Wife's day
because even though she built the kitcar with me, her various health
and mobility issues (even the arthritis in her hands / fingers) would
mean even changing a wheel a pretty difficult / dangerous experience
(even if she was able to find the telescopic brace and get the jack
out and in the right place).
Personally, I rather she didn't have to try ...
Cheers, T i m
Thanks Tim

I didn't miss your post on PunctureSeal, but still feel more
comfortable with the old fashioned spare option.

Phil
--
----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
T i m
2017-12-30 23:01:31 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 21:13:41 +0000 (GMT+00:00), TheChief
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

<snip>
Post by TheChief
Post by T i m
All our cars, motorbikes, cycles and trailers are treated with
Punctureseal because a puncture in any of them at any time would
probably spoil our day. It would definitely spoil the Wife's day
because even though she built the kitcar with me, her various health
and mobility issues (even the arthritis in her hands / fingers) would
mean even changing a wheel a pretty difficult / dangerous experience
(even if she was able to find the telescopic brace and get the jack
out and in the right place).
Personally, I rather she didn't have to try ...
Thanks Tim
You are welcome. ;-)
Post by TheChief
I didn't miss your post on PunctureSeal, but still feel more
comfortable with the old fashioned spare option.
Fair enough, however, IMHO it's not a one or the other solution. ;-(

Someone, when talking about GPS's said he'd just paid a large sum for
a new motorbike and couldn't afford to spend any more on a GPS 'for
it'.

My point was that 'the motorbike' wouldn't GAF about a GPS, the GPS
was *for him*. ;-)

When the LT lead broke off the capacitor on my moped, I used a
screwdriver though the hole in the flywheel to scratch a slot in the
solder and then the screwdriver and a brick to peen the solder back
over the wire and rode home.

When the Morris Minor van lost the top trunion joint whilst going
round a corner on a busy high street, I used my towrope to form a
Spanish Windlass and bind it back together and drove home.

When the clutch cable snapped on my Sierra whilst out with the family
one day, I got the spare out from the boot and with my Leatherman
pocket tool, replaced it at the side of the road and continued with my
day.

When the Bedford CF campervan got a piece of swarf in the carb float
jet, again I used the Leatherman to strip the top off the carb and fix
the problem.

My point is whilst I and many here can and have done those sorts of
things by the roadside and under less than ideal conditions, many
can't and when they can't they can really be in trouble, even if it's
simply parked up on the hard shoulder of a motorway or down some dark
country lane with something as simple as a puncture (assuming it
wasn't driven on for miles at speed and then became a blowout etc).
;-( [1]

So, all of our cars and vans have a spare wheel but because not
everyone who drives them would be able to change a wheel safely, at
night, in the dark and in the rain, I think it's a 'good idea',
especially if you amortized the cost over the number of miles a set of
tyres typically last, that they might just be saved from such a risk
in the first place by the addition of a few quids worth of sealant. In
fact, I can't see why everyone in such circumstances or even if they
aren't, doesn't do it?

Now, one reason might be because not everone knows about such stuff
... or they confuse the negative thoughts surrounding the 'get you
home' cans (like 'they don't work' or 'you can't repair a tyre
afterwards') with the lack of those negatives with the likes of
Punctureseal.

It's not a 'should I carry a torch', it's a 'should I put my safety
belt on or not' choice (IMHO anyway). ;-)

As I said, all our cars and vans have spare tyres (and I try to ensure
they also carry a foot pump and telescopic wheel brace and torch etc)
I am more comforted to know that 'my girls' may never have need to use
them, just for the quick and simple application of a bit of sealant
(daughter did her Corsa and Van herself in the road (in the warm, dry
and daylight <g>) in about 20 mins each).

Just to be clear here, I've never suggested that Punctureseal (as
that's the only one I have long term experience of) can (should) or
will work in every instance, just that I've not had a puncture (that I
know of and with fingers crossed etc) in any tyre I've treated with it
and not lost any air in any of the 5 or so punctures I've used it to
repair retrospectively.

'Of course' many tyre places aren't going to offer you such ...
because they want to sell you tyres and charge for puncture repairs
but I understand there are many organisations who install it as std,
simply because the want to protect their own interests etc.

Cheers, T i m

[1] Years ago the Mrs picked me up from the station and as soon as we
pulled away I heard the anti-static strap rubbing on the ground and
that told me something wasn't right. I got her to stop and a quick
look round the car revealed a partially deflated rear tyre. I believe
if I was driving the vehicle I would have felt it. ;-( So I pumped it
up, we got home and I applied Punctureseal outside the house (still
wearing my suite <g>). The tyre was still on the car when I finally
broke it many years later. ;-)

http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf
Chris J Dixon
2017-12-31 10:01:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
When the LT lead broke off the capacitor on my moped, I used a
screwdriver though the hole in the flywheel to scratch a slot in the
solder and then the screwdriver and a brick to peen the solder back
over the wire and rode home.
There was an occasion, whilst plodding along the East Lancs Road
on my Honda 50, when the slightly oscillating engine sound that I
now know to be the sign of a worn/ stretched chain was followed
by the noise of the chain wrapping itself around the sprocket.

I hitched into Warrington, bought a new chain and chain wheel (no
sprocket in stock), removed flash from the sprocket using the
kerbstone, and continued on my journey.
Post by T i m
When the clutch cable snapped on my Sierra whilst out with the family
one day, I got the spare out from the boot and with my Leatherman
pocket tool, replaced it at the side of the road and continued with my
day.
When my Volvo 240 suddenly failed to close the throttle when I
lifted off, I spotted the failed carburetor spring, improvised
with a bit of elastic, which was fine for the rest of the trip.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
***@cdixon.me.uk

Plant amazing Acers.
T i m
2017-12-31 12:33:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by T i m
When the LT lead broke off the capacitor on my moped, I used a
screwdriver though the hole in the flywheel to scratch a slot in the
solder and then the screwdriver and a brick to peen the solder back
over the wire and rode home.
There was an occasion, whilst plodding along the East Lancs Road
on my Honda 50, when the slightly oscillating engine sound that I
now know to be the sign of a worn/ stretched chain was followed
by the noise of the chain wrapping itself around the sprocket.
;-(
Post by Chris J Dixon
I hitched into Warrington, bought a new chain and chain wheel (no
sprocket in stock), removed flash from the sprocket using the
kerbstone, and continued on my journey.
Very 'stone age'. ;-)

I showed daughter how to knap flint and just how sharp the result
could be.
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by T i m
When the clutch cable snapped on my Sierra whilst out with the family
one day, I got the spare out from the boot and with my Leatherman
pocket tool, replaced it at the side of the road and continued with my
day.
When my Volvo 240 suddenly failed to close the throttle when I
lifted off, I spotted the failed carburetor spring, improvised
with a bit of elastic, which was fine for the rest of the trip.
And that's the thing ... some of us would look, would try to see what
was wrong and try to work out something to allow us to get home
(stories of strings connected to the throttle linkage and brought back
into the cabin etc).

We pulled into a side road and saw someone half up on the verge with a
spare wheel beside his car. It was obvious he had a puncture but
wasn't obvious why he wasn't changing the wheel. We offered to help be
he said he had called the AA ... <shrug>

We generally get a large discount off our AA renewal *because* we only
call them out in an emergency, not because we are too lazy to change a
wheel [1], run out of fuel or not fix the fixable.

Cheers, T i m

[1] I have driven out to the Mrs to change a wheel when she damaged
the sidewall on the car (again, trying to avoid someone who should
have given her right of way) because it was easier and likely quicker
for me to do it than her wait for the AA.
jim
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 21:13:41 +0000 (GMT+00:00), TheChief
<snip>
Post by TheChief
Post by T i m
All our cars, motorbikes, cycles and trailers are treated with
Punctureseal because a puncture in any of them at any time would
probably spoil our day. It would definitely spoil the Wife's day
because even though she built the kitcar with me, her various health
and mobility issues (even the arthritis in her hands / fingers) would
mean even changing a wheel a pretty difficult / dangerous experience
(even if she was able to find the telescopic brace and get the jack
out and in the right place).
Personally, I rather she didn't have to try ...
Thanks Tim
You are welcome. ;-)
Post by TheChief
I didn't miss your post on PunctureSeal, but still feel more
comfortable with the old fashioned spare option.
Fair enough, however, IMHO it's not a one or the other solution. ;-(
Someone, when talking about GPS's said he'd just paid a large sum for
a new motorbike and couldn't afford to spend any more on a GPS 'for
it'.
My point was that 'the motorbike' wouldn't GAF about a GPS, the GPS
was *for him*. ;-)
When the LT lead broke off the capacitor on my moped, I used a
screwdriver though the hole in the flywheel to scratch a slot in the
solder and then the screwdriver and a brick to peen the solder back
over the wire and rode home.
When the Morris Minor van lost the top trunion joint whilst going
round a corner on a busy high street, I used my towrope to form a
Spanish Windlass and bind it back together and drove home.
When the clutch cable snapped on my Sierra whilst out with the family
one day, I got the spare out from the boot and with my Leatherman
pocket tool, replaced it at the side of the road and continued with my
day.
When the Bedford CF campervan got a piece of swarf in the carb float
jet, again I used the Leatherman to strip the top off the carb and fix
the problem.
My point is whilst I and many here can and have done those sorts of
things by the roadside and under less than ideal conditions, many
can't and when they can't they can really be in trouble, even if it's
simply parked up on the hard shoulder of a motorway or down some dark
country lane with something as simple as a puncture (assuming it
wasn't driven on for miles at speed and then became a blowout etc).
;-( [1]
So, all of our cars and vans have a spare wheel but because not
everyone who drives them would be able to change a wheel safely, at
night, in the dark and in the rain, I think it's a 'good idea',
especially if you amortized the cost over the number of miles a set of
tyres typically last, that they might just be saved from such a risk
in the first place by the addition of a few quids worth of sealant. In
fact, I can't see why everyone in such circumstances or even if they
aren't, doesn't do it?
Now, one reason might be because not everone knows about such stuff
... or they confuse the negative thoughts surrounding the 'get you
home' cans (like 'they don't work' or 'you can't repair a tyre
afterwards') with the lack of those negatives with the likes of
Punctureseal.
It's not a 'should I carry a torch', it's a 'should I put my safety
belt on or not' choice (IMHO anyway). ;-)
As I said, all our cars and vans have spare tyres (and I try to ensure
they also carry a foot pump and telescopic wheel brace and torch etc)
I am more comforted to know that 'my girls' may never have need to use
them, just for the quick and simple application of a bit of sealant
(daughter did her Corsa and Van herself in the road (in the warm, dry
and daylight <g>) in about 20 mins each).
Just to be clear here, I've never suggested that Punctureseal (as
that's the only one I have long term experience of) can (should) or
will work in every instance, just that I've not had a puncture (that I
know of and with fingers crossed etc) in any tyre I've treated with it
and not lost any air in any of the 5 or so punctures I've used it to
repair retrospectively.
'Of course' many tyre places aren't going to offer you such ...
because they want to sell you tyres and charge for puncture repairs
but I understand there are many organisations who install it as std,
simply because the want to protect their own interests etc.
Cheers, T i m
[1] Years ago the Mrs picked me up from the station and as soon as we
pulled away I heard the anti-static strap rubbing on the ground and
that told me something wasn't right. I got her to stop and a quick
look round the car revealed a partially deflated rear tyre. I believe
if I was driving the vehicle I would have felt it. ;-( So I pumped it
up, we got home and I applied Punctureseal outside the house (still
wearing my suite <g>). The tyre was still on the car when I finally
broke it many years later. ;-)
http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf
Feck you nearly got to the end without mentioning spunkyseal again...
--
Jim K


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
T i m
2017-12-31 15:00:11 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 31 Dec 2017 12:59:01 +0000 (GMT+00:00), jim <k> wrote:

<snip>
Post by jim
Post by T i m
[1] Years ago the Mrs picked me up from the station and as soon as we
pulled away I heard the anti-static strap rubbing on the ground and
that told me something wasn't right. I got her to stop and a quick
look round the car revealed a partially deflated rear tyre. I believe
if I was driving the vehicle I would have felt it. ;-( So I pumped it
up, we got home and I applied Punctureseal outside the house (still
wearing my suite <g>). The tyre was still on the car when I finally
broke it many years later. ;-)
http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf
Feck you nearly got to the end without mentioning spunkyseal again...
Erm, did you note the topic of this thread:

"Comments on Spare Wheel Alternatives".

I really can't think of a better place to discuss tyre sealants that
that!

And also I'd imagine you (with yer short attention span and yer
Twitter lifestyle) might need a specific product recommendation
signposted a few times to help you understand they aren't all created
equal?

We have already had the 'You can't clean the sealants out of the tyres
so they can't then be repaired professionally' when (at least one that
I have looked at so far) main makers states that's not true.

So, to stop these urban myths getting incorrectly repeated, we have to
make sure even the slowest person 'get's it'. ;-)

Cheers, T i m
jim
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
<snip>
Post by jim
Post by T i m
[1] Years ago the Mrs picked me up from the station and as soon as we
pulled away I heard the anti-static strap rubbing on the ground and
that told me something wasn't right. I got her to stop and a quick
look round the car revealed a partially deflated rear tyre. I believe
if I was driving the vehicle I would have felt it. ;-( So I pumped it
up, we got home and I applied Punctureseal outside the house (still
wearing my suite <g>). The tyre was still on the car when I finally
broke it many years later. ;-)
http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf
Feck you nearly got to the end without mentioning spunkyseal again...
"Comments on Spare Wheel Alternatives".
I really can't think of a better place to discuss tyre sealants that
that!
And also I'd imagine you (with yer short attention span and yer
Twitter lifestyle) might need a specific product recommendation
signposted a few times to help you understand they aren't all created
equal?
We have already had the 'You can't clean the sealants out of the tyres
so they can't then be repaired professionally' when (at least one that
I have looked at so far) main makers states that's not true.
So, to stop these urban myths getting incorrectly repeated, we have to
make sure even the slowest person 'get's it'. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
As overly verbose & vengeful as usual Timothy ;-)

Is there a "Tim-unfriendly" character limit on twatter posts then?
Icgaf ;-)

You forgot to plug (geddit?) spunkyseal again! Doh! :-)
--
Jim K


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
T i m
2018-01-04 23:36:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by jim
Post by T i m
<snip>
Post by jim
Post by T i m
[1] Years ago the Mrs picked me up from the station and as soon as we
pulled away I heard the anti-static strap rubbing on the ground and
that told me something wasn't right. I got her to stop and a quick
look round the car revealed a partially deflated rear tyre. I believe
if I was driving the vehicle I would have felt it. ;-( So I pumped it
up, we got home and I applied Punctureseal outside the house (still
wearing my suite <g>). The tyre was still on the car when I finally
broke it many years later. ;-)
http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf
Feck you nearly got to the end without mentioning spunkyseal again...
"Comments on Spare Wheel Alternatives".
I really can't think of a better place to discuss tyre sealants that
that!
And also I'd imagine you (with yer short attention span and yer
Twitter lifestyle) might need a specific product recommendation
signposted a few times to help you understand they aren't all created
equal?
We have already had the 'You can't clean the sealants out of the tyres
so they can't then be repaired professionally' when (at least one that
I have looked at so far) main makers states that's not true.
So, to stop these urban myths getting incorrectly repeated, we have to
make sure even the slowest person 'get's it'. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
As overly verbose
Like I said, this isn't Twatter but a discussion group Jimmy.
Post by jim
& vengeful as usual Timothy ;-)
Glad I didn't disappoint. ;-)
Post by jim
Is there a "Tim-unfriendly" character limit on twatter posts then?
Pass, never ever used it but I understand it's recently become a bit
more 'discussion friendly'.
Post by jim
Icgaf ;-)
Me neither.
Post by jim
You forgot to plug (geddit?)
Oh how we laughed, I thought I would never start.
Post by jim
spunkyseal again! Doh! :-)
It's good stuff. There are only a few things that would go straight
out and buy if I ever lost / used them up. One would be my Leatherman
PST II multitool, another would be my Garmin GPS(s) (even with my
phone GPSs) and the last would be that particular tyre sealant I like.
The bottom line on that is a (for me even) a puncture can range from a
mild inconvenience (you (I) notice it when you go to your car at home
and when you aren't in a rush to really ruining your day (slow
puncture becoming a blowout on a busy motorway, in the rain, at night,
especially for my wife or daughter), and if I can reduce the instance
of any, then I will. ;-)

Cheers, T i m
jim
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by T i m
Post by jim
Post by T i m
<snip>
Post by jim
Post by T i m
[1] Years ago the Mrs picked me up from the station and as soon as we
pulled away I heard the anti-static strap rubbing on the ground and
that told me something wasn't right. I got her to stop and a quick
look round the car revealed a partially deflated rear tyre. I believe
if I was driving the vehicle I would have felt it. ;-( So I pumped it
up, we got home and I applied Punctureseal outside the house (still
wearing my suite <g>). The tyre was still on the car when I finally
broke it many years later. ;-)
http://www.punctureseal.com/documents/Punctureseal-Millbrook-Test-Report.pdf
Feck you nearly got to the end without mentioning spunkyseal again...
"Comments on Spare Wheel Alternatives".
I really can't think of a better place to discuss tyre sealants that
that!
And also I'd imagine you (with yer short attention span and yer
Twitter lifestyle) might need a specific product recommendation
signposted a few times to help you understand they aren't all created
equal?
We have already had the 'You can't clean the sealants out of the tyres
so they can't then be repaired professionally' when (at least one that
I have looked at so far) main makers states that's not true.
So, to stop these urban myths getting incorrectly repeated, we have to
make sure even the slowest person 'get's it'. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
As overly verbose
Like I said, this isn't Twatter but a discussion group Jimmy.
Post by jim
& vengeful as usual Timothy ;-)
Glad I didn't disappoint. ;-)
Post by jim
Is there a "Tim-unfriendly" character limit on twatter posts then?
Pass, never ever used it but I understand it's recently become a bit
more 'discussion friendly'.
Post by jim
Icgaf ;-)
Me neither.
Post by jim
You forgot to plug (geddit?)
Oh how we laughed, I thought I would never start.
Post by jim
spunkyseal again! Doh! :-)
It's good stuff. There are only a few things that would go straight
out and buy if I ever lost / used them up. One would be my Leatherman
PST II multitool, another would be my Garmin GPS(s) (even with my
phone GPSs) and the last would be that particular tyre sealant I like.
The bottom line on that is a (for me even) a puncture can range from a
mild inconvenience (you (I) notice it when you go to your car at home
and when you aren't in a rush to really ruining your day (slow
puncture becoming a blowout on a busy motorway, in the rain, at night,
especially for my wife or daughter), and if I can reduce the instance
of any, then I will. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
Good man keep it up....
--
Jim K


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
dennis@home
2017-12-31 11:37:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Many thanks for all the useful comment guys.
One annoyance with all this is that the car has what looks like a
full depth spare wheel well.
So to save a few quid and perhaps some weight, the driver gets
stuck with a far interior solution to an age old
problem.
Phil
Just about every car new i have looked at in the last three months has
the option of a spare. Vauxhall charge £95, ford £105, IIRC.
Most drivers don't opt for one as they don't know how to change the
wheel in the first place.

They just call the AA/RAC/GF and let them sort it.
Rod Speed
2017-12-31 18:49:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Many thanks for all the useful comment guys.
One annoyance with all this is that the car has what looks like a
full depth spare wheel well.
So to save a few quid and perhaps some weight, the driver gets
stuck with a far interior solution to an age old
problem.
Phil
Just about every car new i have looked at in the last three months has the
option of a spare. Vauxhall charge £95, ford £105, IIRC.
Most drivers don't opt for one as they don't know how to change the wheel
in the first place.
I don’t believe that. Most don’t stop
and think how much better a spare is.
They just call the AA/RAC/GF and let them sort it.
I bet that that’s a lie on the most.
Roger Mills
2017-12-30 21:14:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Is my lack of confidence in the new alternative justified?
Thanks
Phil
I would not be without a spare of some sort - preferably a full size
wheel and tyre, but if there's not enough space even a spacesaver is
better than nothing. No amount of sealing gunge is going to seal a
decent gash in the tyre if you're unlucky enough to sustain one. If "er
indoors" can't change a wheel herself, somebody else (AA etc. if you
have a breakdown service) will - but only if you carry a serviceable spare.

If you now have a 2014 model, it should by law have been factory fitted
with tyre pressure monitors. If you get a slow puncture from a nail,
etc. these will warn you before the pressure gets dangerously low. It
might be worth considering buying one of those emergency start battery
packs with a built-in tyre inflator (or even just a tyre inflator which
plugs into the cigar socket). That way, if the pressure monitors warn
you of a slow puncture, you can keep topping up the pressure until you
can get it dealt with properly.
--
Cheers,
Roger
____________
Please reply to Newsgroup. Whilst email address is valid, it is seldom
checked.
T i m
2017-12-30 23:19:39 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 21:14:59 +0000, Roger Mills <***@gmail.com>
wrote:

<snip>
Post by Roger Mills
I would not be without a spare of some sort - preferably a full size
wheel and tyre,
Something I used to enjoy on my Lambretta SX150 scooter but not so
easy (realistically) on most our motorbikes. ;-(
Post by Roger Mills
but if there's not enough space even a spacesaver is
better than nothing.
Agreed. We try to carry a folding tyre on the cycles.
Post by Roger Mills
No amount of sealing gunge is going to seal a
decent gash in the tyre if you're unlucky enough to sustain one.
Agreed (and in fact it *should* try to seal such damage). However, it
has been suggested that it can slow the deflation to the point where
it buys you enough time to come to a safe halt or get somewhere
'safe'.
Post by Roger Mills
If "er
indoors" can't change a wheel herself, somebody else (AA etc. if you
have a breakdown service) will
Once they get there ...
Post by Roger Mills
- but only if you carry a serviceable spare.
I believe many carry a 'universal' / Multi-fit wheel that should fit
most common car hubs and stud patterns.

https://www.honestjohn.co.uk/news/miscellaneous/2016-04/aa-launches-a-spare-wheel-that-fits-any-car/
Post by Roger Mills
If you now have a 2014 model, it should by law have been factory fitted
with tyre pressure monitors. If you get a slow puncture from a nail,
etc. these will warn you before the pressure gets dangerously low.
Good idea too. ;-)
Post by Roger Mills
It
might be worth considering buying one of those emergency start battery
packs with a built-in tyre inflator (or even just a tyre inflator which
plugs into the cigar socket).
+! I have one of those (tyre inflator / lamp) along with a
conventional footpump (both in the boot).
Post by Roger Mills
That way, if the pressure monitors warn
you of a slow puncture, you can keep topping up the pressure until you
can get it dealt with properly.
Or ... you could pre-emptively treat all 4 wheels with a sealant that
should prevent you suffering with most punctures in the first place,
dealing with it 'automatically'. ;-)

Cheers, T i m
T i m
2017-12-30 23:21:39 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 23:19:39 +0000, T i m <***@spaced.me.uk> wrote:

<snip>
Post by T i m
Post by Roger Mills
No amount of sealing gunge is going to seal a
decent gash in the tyre if you're unlucky enough to sustain one.
Agreed (and in fact it *should* try to seal such damage).
Doh, *shouldn't* ... ;-(

Cheers, T i m
Jethro_uk
2018-01-02 11:59:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Mills
If you now have a 2014 model, it should by law have been factory fitted
with tyre pressure monitors. If you get a slow puncture from a nail,
etc.
these will warn you before the pressure gets dangerously low.
With the understanding that an equal loss of pressure across all 4 wheels
won't be flagged ...
n***@loampitsfarm.co.uk
2018-01-01 13:25:43 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Dec 2017 14:47:01 +0000 (GMT+00:00), TheChief
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I have no experience and have had no punctures in 9 years such that I
couldn't get to a tyre repair shop.

At work we had several a year and they nearly always wrote the tyre
off.

I got a steel wheel and tyre as a spare and keep it and the gunk plus
inflator, on the grounds if the gunk doesn't work the breakdown
service will have a jack and wheel nut socket as there is no way my
wife or daughters would attempt to change a wheel. If I am nearby I
can take a jack to them.

AJH
Steve Walker
2018-01-04 22:14:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by TheChief
Hi all
We recently changed my Mrs Fiesta for a 2014 model.
This comes with a tyre inflator and some green gunk.
Does anyone have experience of using this type of thing? I'd be
interested to know how they perform with a seriously gashed tyre,
rather than a nail hole.
I was considering going down to the scrap yard to try to get the
jack, wheel etc., But erindoors can't manage those due to back
issues.
Even if she can't, as long as she could get a passerby to help, she
wouldn't be stranded.

Last April my wife, myself and our eldest son attended a family funeral
on the West Coast of Ireland. We flew to Belfast and hired a car. It
turned out that it was brand new and didn't have a spare.

Following the after-funeral meal, we decided to nip back to the cemetary
for a quick visit, but when having to swerve to avoid an oncoming car
that had overcorrected after giving a learner extra space, we suffered a
gashed tyre on the rough edge of the road.

We never got to the cemetary, spent two hours waiting for a recovery
truck, were taken back to the house we were staying in, but were
stranded there with no transport until the car was returned to us at
11:30 the following morning - just in time to set off back to the airport.

We lost the visit to the cemetary, the rest of the evening, all of the
following morning, £45 recovery fee and £180 for the tyre (that I could
have got at a local garage for half the price, if I had the mobility) -
and all for the sake of not having a spare that I could have changed in
less than 10 minutes.

SteveW
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